Trans Mountain Pipeline Loses Lead Insurer as Zurich Steps Away

Mammoth global insurance company Zurich has decided to abandon its role as principal insurer for the Trans Mountain pipeline when its coverage expires August 31.

Trans Mountain Pipeline Loses Lead Insurer as Zurich Steps Away

Mammoth global insurance company Zurich has decided to abandon its role as principal insurer for the Trans Mountain pipeline when its coverage expires August 31.

New Study Projects 2.6 to 3.9°C Warming if Humanity Lets Atmospheric CO2 Double

A new study has narrowed the range of likely answers to one of the oldest questions in climate science: how much average global warming to expect if humanity doubles the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It rules out both the high- and low-end estimates in past calculations, placing the “equilibrium climate sensitivity” window between 2.6 and 3.9°C.

Carbon emissions from a coal plant in Germany

Global Cash-for-Clunkers Program Would Speed Up Lagging Coal Plant Retirements

The slow pace of coal plant retirements around the world has a veteran climate advocate calling for a “cash for clunkers” program to speed up the process of getting the world’s most carbon-intensive fuel out of circulation.

South Pole Warms Three Times Faster than Global Average

The South Pole may be the coldest place on Earth, but it has been warming at three times to global rate over the last 30 years, according to new research published last week in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Queen Elizabeth’s Wealth Manager Dumps Tar Sands/Oil Sands, Arctic Oil and Gas, Coal

Coutts, the private banker to Queen Elizabeth II and the rest of the British royal family, has promised to drop its investments in the tar sands/oil sands, Arctic oil and gas exploration, and thermal coal extraction and generation, and to reduce the carbon intensity of its holdings 25% by the end of next year.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extraction_of_petroleum

Indigenous Leaders Warn They May Be Left Out of Abandoned Well Cleanup Fund

Indigenous leaders are concerned their communities may be left out as Alberta, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia begin spending C$1.5 billion in federal funds to clean up abandoned oil and gas wells left behind by deadbeat fossils.

Week 26, June 29: Global Engagement

Unless every nation pulls its weight, global emissions will continue to rise and the climate emergency will cause an ever more disastrous future.

38°C Heat in Siberian Town Sets New Record Above Arctic Circle

The northeastern Siberian town of Verkhoyansk is believed to have set an all-time high temperature record above the Arctic Circle Saturday when thermometers soared to 38°C/100.4°F. The town is located 4,800 kilometres north of Moscow, has been keeping temperature records since 1885, and normally sees an average June temperature of 20°C/68°F.

Ovintiv Gears for ‘Lower Production Growth’ by Cutting Work Force 25%

Ovintiv Inc. laid off 640 staff, or about 25% of its work force last week, just 7½ months after triggering a wave of overwrought grief in Canada by changing its name from Encana Corporation and moving its head office out of Calgary.

Week 25, June 22: Climate Adaptation and Preparedness

Because of humanity’s failure to reduce and re-absorb our carbon pollution, and the continuing accumulation of heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere, the climate crisis will continue to worsen and become costlier every year.

Tar Sands/Oil Sands Firms Drop $1.8B in Environmental Projects in COVID Cost Cuts

Three of Canada’s top tar sands/oil sands companies have dropped C$1.8 billion in environmental projects as part of their cost-cutting during the pandemic, prompting at least one major investment fund to declare itself vindicated for divesting from the companies last year.

‘Industry Consortium’ to Intervene in Ecojustice Case Against ‘Foreign Funded Radicals’ Panel

A self-styled “industry consortium” that includes pro-fossil provocateur Brett Wilson will be allowed to intervene in a court case launched by Ecojustice, aimed at quashing the Jason Kenney government’s C$2.5-million inquiry into supposed interference in the Alberta oilpatch by “foreign-funded radicals”.

Burnaby Opponents Point to 190,000-Litre Trans Mountain Spill as Wake-Up Call for Future Hazards

Opponents of the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline are pointing to a crude oil spill at the Sumas pump station in Abbotsford, British Columbia Saturday as a wake-up call for what could happen if the expanded pipe is extended all the way to Burnaby, B.C.

Week 24, June 15: Ecological Restoration

We face an ecological as well as a climate emergency. Because of our human influence, Earth is in the midst a mass extinction crisis: up to a million species are threatened with extinction, many within decades.

Nobel Economist Nordhaus Proposes Import Tariffs to Enforce National Climate Action

The U.S. economist who shared a Nobel Prize for his work as a carbon pricing pioneer is now advocating import tariffs to penalize countries that don’t participate in international climate agreements.

Week 23, June 8: Regenerative Farming

Studies show that regenerative organic methods of farming and ranching can produce similar yields to conventional agribusiness while storing carbon in the soil, producing no GHG emissions, and allowing nature to regenerate. Forty years of side-by-side trials by the Rodale Institute in Pennsylvania have found that after a five-year transition, the yields from organic farming are competitive with conventional farming, and that in drought years, yields can be up to five times higher

Early Hurricanes Kill 14 in El Salvador, Threaten Major Damage in Gulf of Mexico

Hurricane season in the East Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico is off to an early and deadly start this year, with 14 killed as Tropical Storm Amanda swept through El Salvador and forecasters keeping a close eye on Tropical Storm Cristobal as it moves toward the Texas and Louisiana coasts.

Minnesota Regulator Delays Line 3 Construction to 2021

Calgary-based Enbridge Inc. will have to postpone a large chunk of the work on its controversial Line 3 pipeline to 2021, after a Minnesota regulator announced a public hearing this summer to review the company’s plans to protect streams and wetlands.

Ocean Warming Means ‘Escalating Threats’ to Marine Life through 2100

The climate in the world’s deep oceans could be changing seven times faster by mid-century, even if humanity manages a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, according to a study published late last month in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Locust-Driven Famine Threatens Millions as COVID-19 Rages

Experts are urging policy-makers in Africa and Asia to fight the escalating locust plague at the same time as they combat the COVID-19 pandemic, warning that famine will be a very real threat for millions without strong, pre-emptive action.

Keystone Faces Delays After Appeal Court Upholds Withdrawal of Environmental Permit

The Keystone XL pipeline and other U.S. pipeline projects are facing further delays, after a federal appeal court in California declined last week to reverse a lower court decision to cancel a national environmental permit that had enabled construction to proceed.

Week 22, June 1: Regenerative Forestry

It is not our emissions as such that are causing the climate emergency: it is our accumulated emissions. Our world therefore faces not one but two climate challenges: Reducing human-caused emissions to zero, and bringing the atmospheric burden of carbon down to its pre-industrial level.

Fossil Shareholders, Executives Gain While Companies Falter, New Analyses Show

Four of the world’s five biggest fossils are paying money out to their shareholders faster than they’re taking it in, and a good number of U.S. fossil executives can expect lavish payouts while their companies crash around their ears, according to separate analyses this week by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) and the Reuters news agency.

Oil Price Crash Hits Royalty-Dependent Indigenous Communities

Plummeting oil revenues are walloping more than 100 Indigenous communities across Western Canada that depend financially on fossil drilling within their territories—with the lost royalties and jobs putting social programs, youth supports, and personal livelihoods at risk in the face of steep pandemic-related costs.

Fossils May Think Twice Before Accepting Federal Bailout Package

After weeks of demanding a federal bailout in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, Canadian fossils might be thinking twice about accepting the loans they’re being offered, mergers and acquisitions specialist Jeffrey Jones writes for the Globe and Mail.

Week 21, May 25: Green Finance

The climate emergency poses four risks to the stability of Canada’s financial system: insurance losses due to climate-related disasters, climate liability stemming from successful lawsuits, stranded fossil assets, and GDP losses resulting in a climate-caused collapse of financial confidence.

Carbon Emissions Fell 17% at Pandemic’s Peak, But Will Rebound Without Bigger Changes

While the economic crash brought on by the coronavirus pandemic reduced daily greenhouse gas emissions 17% in early April, and will likely produce a 4.0 to 7.0% emissions reduction for the year, the real takeaway from a new analysis in the journal Nature Climate Change is that those carbon cuts will only be temporary without an aggressive response to the climate crisis.

Swedish Firm Produces World’s First Rolled Steel with Hydrogen

A company in Sweden reported a world first late last month, after replacing liquefied natural gas (LNG) with hydrogen to produce the high-temperature heat it needs to make steel.

Rockefeller Fund Shows Five-Year Gain After Dropping Fossil Investments

In defiance of market predictions, the US$1.1-billion Rockefeller Brothers Fund has surpassed its benchmarks since an almost complete divestment from fossil fuels five years ago—proving that what was once dismissed as a “symbolic gesture” was in fact an act of significant financial acuity.

Week 20, May 18: Green Industry

In 2017 heavy industry produced 73 Mt of CO2e, accounting for 10% of Canada’s emissions, including non-fossil-fuel mining, smelting and refining, and the production and processing of industrial goods such as fertilizer, paper and cement.

Week 18, May 4: Green Business

To encourage businesses to engage with the transition we will advance a Carbon Accountability Act (Week 1), which starting in January 2021 will require businesses with more than $25 million in annual sales to publish their annual carbon emissions, describe efforts to reduce their emissions, and disclose their climate risk, both physically and financially.

EU Rapidly Shunning Coal as Renewable Power Prices Drop

After centuries of being powered by coal, Europe is accelerating away from this dirtiest and most expensive of fossil fuels and toward ever-cheaper renewables—a sea change that is also going global, as pandemic-shuttered economies around the world leave coal increasingly without buyers.

Week 17, April 27: Fossil-Fuel Wind-Down

In 2017, Canada’s oil and gas sector produced 195 Mt of CO2e, accounting for 27% of the country’s emissions. Between 2020 and 2024, oil and gas corporations are planning to invest US$1.4 trillion in new extraction projects, 85% of which are in the U.S. or Canada, 50% of which former Bank of England governor Mark Carney tells us will result in stranded financial assets.

Week 16, April 20: An Efficient Renewable Energy Grid

To ensure that Canada’s power utilities continue to produce reliable, dispatchable power through the transition to 100% renewable energy, we will provide $100 million in Renewable Grid Research Grants over 10 years to develop improved systems of utility power storage and grid reliability.

Week 15, April 13: First Nations and Rural Opportunities

In the Yukon, $200 million is spent each year to import diesel to provide power and heat for the territory’s 40,000 people, averaging $5,000 per person, $25,000 for a family of five.

Four B.C. First Nations Seek Supreme Court Appeal on Trans Mountain

Four British Columbia First Nations are seeking permission for a Supreme Court appeal of a lower court’s unanimous decision supporting the federal government’s re-approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion.

Some New Habits May Continue as Coronavirus Drives 38% Drop in Airline Emissions

Airlines’ greenhouse gas emissions are set to fall 38% this year as the coronavirus pandemic drives down travel demand, and the Australia Institute says some of the reductions may be permanent as businesses reassess their need for travel.

COVID-19 May Deliver ‘One-Two Punch’ to Flood, Wildfire Response

The potential for a one-two punch—natural disaster plus COVID-19—has emergency preparedness teams across Canada working feverishly to be ready for complex battles that could range from wildfire smoke increasing the risk of serious lung infections, to trying to sandbag flooded rivers while keeping the imperative of social distancing.

Week 14, April 6: Renewable Electricity

In 2017, the generation of electricity from fossil fuels produced 74 Mt (10.3%) of Canada’s emissions. Renewable energy has become the cheapest option for new power generation. Onshore wind and solar PV power are now less expensive than any fossil-fuel option, without financial assistance.

UN Postpones COP 26 Due to COVID-19 Pandemic

The United Nations has postponed this year’s global climate change conference, COP 26, to the middle of next year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Scotford Upgrader Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta

Shell Postpones ‘Crucial Maintenance’ on Alberta Upgrader to Minimize COVID-19 Risk

Shell Canada is postponing what the Calgary Herald describes as “crucial maintenance” on its Scotford tar sands/oil sands upgrader in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, to minimize transmission of the coronavirus.

Week 13, March 30: Sustainable Aviation

Domestic and international aviation produced 21 Mt of CO2e in 2017 (14.34 Mt international, 6.67 Mt domestic), representing 3% of Canada’s emissions. Emissions are rising by 1 Mt a year. Fuel consumption and GHG emissions rose by 65.5% between 2005 and 2017, averaging 4.3% per year, in spite of a 17.6% increase in aircraft fuel efficiency.

European Oil Major Cuts Costs, Protects Renewables, as Stranded Fossil Assets Begin Looking ‘Inevitable’

Like most of their counterparts around the world, colossal fossils in Europe are slashing spending in response to an oil price crash triggered by the pandemic and a pitched price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia. But so far, at least, three of the biggest and one in particular seem to be protecting their renewable energy businesses from the economic carnage, Greentech Media reports.

Officials Weigh Postponing COP 26 Despite Urgent Timing for Climate Action

Scarcely seven months before a United Nations conference where countries will be under pressure to agree on fast, decisive action on climate change, the coronavirus pandemic is raising serious questions about whether the event will have to be cancelled—or possibly shifted to an all-virtual gathering.

Week 12, March 23: Zero Emissions Railways, Freight and Heavy Equipment

Canada has 46,000 kilometres of railways, almost all of which operate on diesel. In 2017, GHGs from the rail sector were 6.6 Mt CO2e, representing 0.9% of Canada’s 716 Mt. Only 129 kilometres are electrified. Studies indicate that electrification costs around $5 million per kilometre. This suggests that spread over 20 years, complete electrification would cost $230 billion, $11.5 billion a year, or $32,400 per tonne of avoided CO2e.

Week 11, March 16: Electric Vehicles

Our current target is that 10% of total light-duty vehicle sales should be zero-emissions vehicles (ZEV) by 2025, 30% by 2030 and 100% by 2040.

Tar Sands/Oil Sands See Sharp Decline in Capital Spending, Job Creation

Alberta’s tar sands/oil sands have shifted decisively into a “mature” phase of development in which job creation and capital spending will continue to lag and new technologies will replace a large share of the work force laid off due to “lower-for-longer” oil prices between 2014 and 2016, according to a new analysis this week by the Edmonton-based Parkland Institute.

Switzerland’s UBS Yanks Funding for New Arctic Offshore Oil, Thermal Coal, Tar Sands/Oil Sands

Switzerland’s UBS Group AG has decided it will no longer finance offshore oil development in the Arctic, thermal coal mines, or tar sands/oil sands projects on undeveloped land, and will scrutinize liquefied natural gas and ultra-deepwater drilling projects more carefully before committing to them.

Buckley: Delayed Shift Out of Fossil Fuels Could Leave $20 Trillion in Stranded Assets

Investors and financiers will find themselves confronted with up to US$20 trillion in stranded fossil energy assets by 2050 unless they embrace the shift to clean energy, warns Tim Buckley, director of energy finance studies with the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), in a recent summary of a podcast he recorded last month.

Bahamas Fights to Rebuild after Devastating Hurricanes

Six months after Hurricane Dorian came roaring ashore in the Bahamas, locals are still struggling to repair their own shattered lives, depending on each other and the ongoing commitment of international charities. Meanwhile, government efforts are focused on rebuilding the island nation’s tourist economy.

Hope for Stability Fades as Guyana Becomes Nascent Petro-State

Hopes that Guyana’s nascent democracy and fragile economy might defy standard petro-state precedents and realize only benefits from the country’s sudden vault into the ranks of the oil-rich have grown dimmer in recent weeks, as the new wealth fuels pre-existing ethnic tensions.

Week 10, March 9: Walking, Cycling and Transit

Transportation produces 174 Mt of CO2e emissions a year, accounting for 24% of Canada’s emissions. We need to reduce this to zero by 2040.

Climate Groups Accuse EU of ‘Surrender’ on 2030 Emissions Target

EU climate groups are accusing legislators of “surrender” after the European Commission approved a draft regulation for the continent’s Green Deal that makes its net-zero target for 2050 legally binding and sets an interim target for 2030, but contains no fixed goals for the crucial decade of action beginning now.

Alberta Announces $100M Loan for Orphan Well Clean-Up

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and Energy Minister Sonya Savage have announced a C$100-million loan to help the province’s Orphan Well Association clean up another 1,000 abandoned oil and gas production sites, while creating 500 jobs for unemployed oilfield service workers.

1.5°C Warming Means ‘Breathtaking’ $900-Billion Loss for Colossal Fossils

The world’s oil and gas companies may have to write off a “breathtaking” US$900 billion in stranded assets—about one-third of their total value—if governments get serious about limiting average global warming to 1.5°C, according to the news analysis page that calls itself the “oldest and arguably the most influential business and finance column of its kind in the world”.

http://www.greenpeace.org/canada/en/campaigns/Energy/tarsands/

Tar Sands/Oil Sands Cancellation the Least of Teck’s Problems as Analysts Question Mine Cost Overrun

While Teck Resources’ bombshell decision to walk away from its $20.6-billion Frontier tar sands/oil sands mine has received wall-to-wall coverage in the last seven days, the company’s broader financial picture is a bigger concern for investors, the Globe and Mail reports.

Antarctic Island Loses 20% of Annual Snow Cover in Sudden Warming Event

New NASA satellite imagery released February 21 points to a startling, sudden warming event near the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, the part of the continent closest to South America, where high barometric pressure and changes in wind patterns drove dramatic melting on Eagle Island.

Brazil Fires Top Climate Policy Staff, Calling Paris Commitment Into Further Doubt

The environment ministry in Brazil has fired the director and deputy director responsible for its climate change programs, at a moment when the international community is looking more closely at the climate impact of the country’s moves to clearcut the Amazon rainforest. 

Week 9, March 2: Green Buildings

Buildings produce 12% of Canada’s GHGs. The challenge is two-fold: new builds, and retrofitting Canada’s 15 million homes and 480,000 industrial, commercial and institutional buildings.

Alberta Delays Report Showing Warming, Climate Impacts Above Global Average

The Alberta government dragged its feet for six months before releasing a report it previously commissioned from climate scientists Katharine Hayhoe and Anne Stoner that shows the province warming faster than the rest of the planet due to human activity, with “profound impacts on the province’s economy, infrastructure, and public health,” Global News reports.

Devastating Locust Swarms Tied to Climate Change

Devastating locust swarms in East Africa are being linked to climate change-driven cyclones, while response to the crisis is being stymied and the threat of food insecurity grows. 

Teck Withdrawal a ‘Wake-Up Call’ for a ‘Version of Alberta that No Longer Exists’

Teck Resources’ blockbuster decision to walk away from its C$20.6-billion Frontier tar sands/oil sands mine was a “wake-up call” to abandon “a version of Alberta that no longer exists,” Calgary-based opinion writer and self-described “proud centrist” Max Fawcett writes in an opinion piece for CBC News.

Don’t Use Public Pensions to Prop Up Carbon-Heavy Industries, Alberta Unions Say

Alberta’s public pensions shouldn’t be used to prop up carbon-intensive fossil industries at a time when private investors are abandoning the sector, the Alberta Federation of Labour warned in a statement last week.

Week 8, February 24: Cohesive Communities

Every community in Canada needs the capacity and skills to embrace the transition, becoming strong and resourceful. In Britain, the Lambeth Study on participatory culture found that success in building a cohesive community requires regular engagement by 10-15% of the residents, and an investment of $140 per resident.

Week 7, February 17: Climate Education and Research

A proper scientific understanding of the climate emergency and its solutions is essential for all Canadians as we tackle this massive challenge.

Study Shows Governments, Scientists Underestimating Fossils’ Methane Releases by 25-40%

Governments and scientists are underestimating methane leaks from oil and gas operations by 25 to 40%, meaning that tens of millions of tons of a greenhouse gas more than 80 times as potent as carbon dioxide may have gone unaccounted for, according to a contentious new study published Wednesday in the prestigious journal Nature.

Europe Could Cut Emissions 60% by Electrifying Fossil-Intensive Industries

Europe could reduce emissions in its transport, buildings, and electrical sectors 60% by 2050 by converting fossil-intensive industries to run on electricity, according to a report earlier this month by Norwegian utility Statkraft and power management company Eaton Corporation.

Week 6, February 10: Prairie Solutions

To the frontline workers in the coal, oil, and gas industries: we understand your concerns. We need to bring the age of fossil fuels to a smooth but rapid ending, while protecting you and your families and communities.

Week 5, February 3: Climate Engagement

Without widespread citizen engagement it will not be possible to achieve our climate goals. The new initiatives announced today will build on Canada’s Climate Action Fund, which funds initiatives that raise awareness of climate change and build capacity to increase climate action.

BREAKING: Cancelled Project Means the ‘End of New Coal’ in Europe

Lawyers at ClientEarth are heralding “the end for new coal” in Europe, after Polish utilities Enea and Energa announced last night that they would suspend work on the controversial new Ostrołęka C plant, citing economic concerns.

Massive Study Links Gender-Based Violence to Climate Change, Environmental Degradation

Climate impacts and environmental degradation are driving an increase in violence against women and girls, while gender-based exploitation obstructs efforts to address the combined crisis, according to a massive study released late last month by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

kangaroo wildfire Australia

Australia ‘Megafires’ Hit Wildlife Harder than Regular Blazes

The unprecedented speed and ferocity of Australia’s “megafires” wiped out far more animals than a normal fire would, and those that survived face a perilous future within ecosystems that were already broken by drought before they were incinerated by flames.

Week 4, January 27: Our Climate Investments

To address the climate and ecological emergencies and to support Canada’s transition to renewable energy and ecologically-managed forestry, farming and fisheries, in addition to large private sector investments, the Bank of Canada, new public banks, utilities, municipalities and citizens will collectively invest $62.7 billion a year, representing 3.6% of Canada’s estimated $1,735 billion GDP in 2020.

Warming Speeds Up Ocean Currents Far Sooner Than Climate Models Predicted

Just over three-quarters of the world’s oceans have sped up in the last decade, in what the Washington Post calls a “massive development that was not expected to occur until climate warming became much more advanced”.

Garneau Orders Slower Speeds After Second Oil Train Derailment in Two Months

Transport Minister Marc Garneau has ordered all large trains carrying dangerous goods to slow their speeds along federal rail lines for 30 days, after a second crude oil train in two months derailed near the Saskatchewan hamlet of Guernsey.

Coronavirus Drives Sharpest Oil Demand Drop Since 9/11

Oil consumption in China is down 20 to 25% this month and at least one market analyst firm has cut its projection for global oil prices, as the coronavirus drives the biggest demand shock fossils have seen since the 2008 economic crash, and the most sudden one since 9/11.

Week 3, January 20: Canada’s Carbon Tax

Carbon taxation is a net benefit to all Canadians and an essential tool as we navigate a rapid transition to renewable energy. The current tax is $30 per tonne in 2020, rising by $10 a year to $50 by 2022, the revenue from which is being returned to Canadians as tax rebates.

Week 2, January 13: A Green New Deal

In Week 2 of Guy Dauncey’s 26-week climate emergency transition plan, Canada introduces a Green New Deal in partnership with business, labour unions, First Nations and non-profit societies to manage a 20-year transition off fossil fuels in a planned, coordinated manner.

Scientists Say World’s ‘Riskiest’ Glacier May Be Melting at Faster Rate

Scientists are becoming concerned that the Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica, considered the “most important” and “riskiest” glacier in the world and sometimes known as the “doomsday” glacier, may be melting at a faster rate, due to water at the base of the ice that is above the freezing point.

UK’s Net Zero Pledge Undermined by Poor Communication

More than 80% of U.K. citizens support their government’s “net zero by 2050” pledge, but fewer than half really understand what that push will entail or even why it’s necessary—a failure of communication that could torpedo the country’s efforts to decarbonize.

Week 1, January 6: Climate Governance

Week 1 of Guy Dauncey’s climate emergency scenario envisions Ottawa forming a Climate Emergency Advisory Committee that will meet monthly, chaired by the Prime Minister. The Committee’s mandate is to upgrade the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change targeting a 65% reduction in Canada’s 716 megatonnes (Mt) of greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 and 100% by 2040.

Spain Adopts National Climate Emergency Declaration

Spain adopted a climate emergency declaration earlier this week, with officials promising to send legislation to the national parliament in the next 100 days to drive action on the crisis.

Building Automation Would Save 4.62 Gigatons of Carbon by 2050

Building automation ranks #45 on Drawdown’s list of climate solutions. It could eliminate up to 4.62 gigatons of carbon dioxide by 2050 at a cost of US$68.1 billion, eventually saving building owners around $880.6 billion.

Mixed Results for 2019 Show Slight Rise in Renewable Energy Investment

World renewable energy investment hit US$282.2 billion last year, slightly higher than 2018’s total of $280.2 billion, with investment declining in China but hitting a record high in the United States, Bloomberg New Energy Finance reports.

45 Million in Southern Africa Face ‘Critical Levels of Hunger’

Climate-induced drought and severe flooding, coupled with economic woes, have left 45 million people across Southern Africa facing critical levels of hunger and in desperate need of support from the international community, the United Nations World Food Program (WFP) warns.

Construction on Cross-Border Segment of Keystone XL to Begin in April

Construction on the 1.9-kilometre segment of the contested Keystone XL pipeline that crosses the Canada-U.S. border is set to begin in April, according to a filing last week with the U.S. District Court in Montana.

Alaska pipeline winter

Supreme Court Rejects B.C.’s Challenge to Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion

The Supreme Court of Canada has unanimously rejected British Columbia’s challenge to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, concluding that the province’s bid to regulate the flow of heavy oil through its territory would defeat the federal government’s constitutional authority to approve and regulate interprovincial pipelines.

http://www.greenpeace.org/canada/en/campaigns/Energy/tarsands/

Teck Mega-Mine Shows ‘Misguided and Reckless’ Disregard for Low Oil Prices

Teck Resources’ proposed C$20.6-billion Frontier tar sands/oil sands mega-mine in Alberta reflects a “misguided and reckless” disregard for economics, given a review panel’s approval that assumed an unrealistically high world oil price “for years to come”, according to an analysis released this week by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).

2019 Stock Index Results Show Fossil Companies as Worst-Performing Segment

The fossil energy sector was the worst-performing segment of the Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index last year, despite a healthy increase in world oil prices, with the value of energy stocks increasing 7.9% compared to 29% for the index as a whole.

Biggest-Ever Arctic Expedition Seeks to Understand Changing Ecosystem Before it Collapses

The world’s biggest-ever Arctic study expedition is being stunned, stymied, unnerved, and occasionally exhilarated, as a rotating team of more than 300 researchers operating from a German icebreaker scramble to understand the complex, changing ecosystem at the heart of the climate crisis before it collapses.

Canada Faces Similar Wildfire Risk to Australia, as Alberta Lays Off Specialist Firefighters

With heat waves and extended drought making Canada vulnerable to massive wildfires like the ones now sweeping Australia, Alberta has cut funding and jobs for about 63 specialized remote-region firefighters—and British Columbia is “poaching” some of them to join its own wildfire prevention and response team.

Climate-Driven Temperatures Will Kill More in 2100 than Infectious Diseases Today

Climate-driven temperature shifts will kill more people in 2100 that infectious diseases do today, making health and safety impacts an important factor in calculating the social cost of carbon, says University of Chicago economist Michael Greenstone, co-director of the university’s Climate Impact Lab.

Russia Sets Adaptation Agenda, Plans to ‘Use the Advantages’ of Changing Climate

Russia is planning to “use the advantages” of a changing climate at the same time that it adapts its economy and populations to climate impacts, according to a government document posted last weekend.

‘Groundbreaking’ Supreme Court Ruling Mandates Fast Carbon Cut in The Netherlands

Dutch campaigners are declaring an “immense victory for climate justice” after a strongly-worded supreme court judgement December 20 upheld governments’ human rights duty to protect citizens from climate change and ordered The Netherlands to cut greenhouse gas emissions 25% below 1990 levels by the end of this year.

Austria to Set 2040 Carbon Neutral Target as Greens Join Coalition Government

Austria is poised to become a European “forerunner” in climate protection and set a 2040 carbon-neutral target after the centre-right People’s Party (Oe Vp) and the Greens announced a coalition government last Thursday.

Europe Threatens Border Adjustment Tariff for Climate Laggards Like U.S.

In what Politico interprets as a lesson learned from Donald Trump’s trade wars, the European Union is threatening a carbon tariff on countries like the United States that refuse to step up and commit to getting their greenhouse gas emissions under control.

Alberta Faces Skepticism for War Room Announcement, Trashes Its Own Claim that Carbon Tax Hurts GDP

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney is having a rough week, with two veteran journalists questioning the potential impact of his much-anticipated fossil war room and his own government’s court documents undercutting his claim that the previous NDP government’s carbon levy harmed the province’s economy.

South Korea Temporarily Shuts 10 Coal Plants, Dials 41 Others Back to 80% Output

A sputtering coal industry has taken yet another hit, with South Korea temporarily shuttering 10 of its 60 coal-fired power plants in a bid to curb air pollution, reports Reuters.

Victor: Acting on Emission Cuts, Solving ‘Hard Problems’ Matters More than Statements of Ambition

The utter failure of leadership at this year’s United Nations climate conference shows that the next step for climate leaders is to evaluate everything they do “through the lens of whether it increases the chances of followership,” international relations specialist David G. Victor writes for the New York Times.

Melting Permafrost Turns Arctic into Net Source of Greenhouse Gases

As scientists grow ever more certain that the Arctic is becoming a net contributor to climate change as its carbon- and methane-heavy permafrost melts, the 35 million people who call the polar region home fear exposure to heavy metals and dangerous pathogens, while witnessing a collapsing food chain.

Oceans Face Oxygen Loss, Acidification as Warming Challenges Ability to Absorb Carbon

With the Earth’s oceans rapidly and dangerously losing oxygen due to a combination of global warming and pollution, Greenpeace is urging countries to restore and protect the planet’s marine ecosystems, both for their own sake and because a healthy ocean is vital to fighting the climate emergency.

12-Point Agenda Lays Out Possibilities for Global Energy Efficiency Gains

A 12-point agenda released by three of the world’s leading energy efficiency councils is setting out the steps countries can take to bring annual efficiency improvements up to a Paris Agreement-compliant 3%.

Did Kenney Just Link the Moody’s Ratings Agency to His Anti-Alberta Conspiracy Theory?

So, look, just because a major credit rating agency reviewed Alberta’s fossil-dependent economy and issued a downgrade, there’s nothing wrong with the province’s economic strategy. It just means Moody’s Investors Service is “completely factually wrong”, and probably a part of an international conspiracy to persecute the Canadian oilpatch.

Hamilton Granddad Sees Hope for Alberta Transition in Ontario’s Past Economic Pain

In a heartfelt letter to westerners going through the economic pain he endured in the 1990s, when free trade agreements shut down 200,000 manufacturing jobs in Ontario’s industrial heartland, Hamilton resident Robert Fraser is urging his fellow Canadians in the oilpatch to “put aside the climate change thing for a bit and focus on some realities”.

WMO Declares 2010s the Warmest Decade on Record as Climate Impacts Accelerate

The 2010s are almost certain to take their place as the warmest decade on record, and 2015-2019 as the five-year span with the highest average temperatures ever, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) reports, in a dire provisional statement released Tuesday at the beginning of this year’s United Nations climate negotiations in Madrid.

Arctic Temperatures Up to 11° Above Normal Produce Treacherously Thin Ice

Treacherously thin ice, arriving very late, is one of the immediate impacts of the shockingly warm temperatures this autumn across much of the far North, reports The Canadian Press.

Federally-Owned Trans Mountain Takes Criticism for Surveillance on Indigenous Opponents

In a move that legal experts are condemning as a disquieting disregard for the democratic rights of assembly and free expression, federally-owned Trans Mountain Corporation has been conducting surveillance on its opponents, trolling their social media posts, and exchanging intelligence with the RCMP.

Carbon emissions from a coal plant in Germany

Record GHG Concentrations Prompt Call for Drastic Action to Reduce Emissions

A pair of alarming reports from United Nations agencies shows greenhouse gas emissions at record levels and rising at a faster annual rate, meaning that efforts to counter the climate crisis must increase three- to five-fold to avoid a world of 3.2°C average global warming in less than 100 years.

EU European Union

EU to Declare Climate Emergency Ahead of UN Climate Conference Next Week

European Union legislators are on track to declare a climate emergency ahead of the annual United Nations climate conference opening next week in Madrid, while stressing that the symbolic statement must be backed up by action.

Oil and gas investment Canada Pension Board

Corporate Connections Drive $4 Billion in Fossil Investment by Canadian Pension Board

With more than C$4 billion invested in the world’s top 200 publicly-traded fossils, the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB) is placing bets that those companies will exceed the 1.5°C carbon emission targets in the Paris Agreement, according to a report released last week by the Corporate Mapping Project and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

Woman holding a koala

UPDATE: Climate Community Reacts After Business Journal Overstates Koala Extinction Risk

The massive bushfires sweeping New South Wales, Australia have experts debating whether koalas are now “functionally extinct”, after flames killed more than 1,000 of the animals and burned 80% of their habitat.

Ecojustice Challenges ‘Partisan Political Purposes’ Behind Alberta’s Foreign Funding Inquiry

Environmental law charity Ecojustice has filed a legal challenge against the Kenney government’s C$2.5-million commission on supposed “foreign-funded radicals” opposing the Alberta fossil industry, asserting the probe was set up for “partisan political purposes” and has been tainted by bias in its operations.

‘Being Rich Matters’ as $7.9 Trillion in Future Climate Impacts Hit Africa Hardest

The impacts of climate change could cost the world’s economy US$7.9 trillion by 2050, according to the latest climate resilience index from a leading UK-based finance and economics magazine.

Grassy Mountain Coal Mine

Alberta Coal Phaseout Shows Need for ‘Deliberate, Coordinated’ Transition

Supported by Rachel Notley’s provincial government, and at least partially imperiled by Jason Kenney’s, Alberta’s plan to phase out coal by 2030 offers critical lessons on how best to support the transition to the green economy, according to a new report from the University of Alberta’s Parkland Institute.

Keystone Spill Affected 10 Times More Land Than Regulator First Reported

The 1.4 million litres of tar sands/oil sands bitumen that spilled from the Keystone pipeline late last month affected 10 times more land than North Dakota state regulators initially reported, state environmental scientist Bill Seuss said Monday.

Fossils Claim They Receive No Subsidies as Fossil Subsidy Review Bogs Down

Canada’s fossil lobby is setting out to redefine the lavish government handouts it receives as anything but a subsidy, even as the federal finance department drags its feet on a binational peer review intended to quantify that funding as a first step to phasing it out.

Absence of Other Choices Drives Indigenous Role in Oil and Gas

The potent power of oil and gas is dividing Indigenous communities in western Canada, with one side championing the industry as the only available path away from poverty, while the other condemns it as a neocolonialist destroyer of Indigenous values and the global climate.

Efficient Water Distribution Would Save 870 Megatons of Carbon by 2050

More efficient water distribution places #71 on the Drawdown list of climate solutions. It could cut atmospheric carbon dioxide by 870 megatons by 2050 at a cost of US$137.4 billion, producing net savings of $903.1 billion.

Swedish Central Bank Sells Off Carbon-Intensive Alberta Bonds

Sweden’s central bank has sold its Alberta Government bonds and declared it will no longer invest in assets with high carbon footprints, even if they offer solid financial yields.

New Zealand Legislates Net Zero by 2050 with Cross-Partisan Support

New Zealand has adopted a legislated target to hit net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

Latest Fossil Bankruptcy Could Add 1,400 Orphan Wells, Pipelines to Alberta Cleanup Backlog

Alberta is on the hook for as many as 1,400 more abandoned oil and gas wells and associated infrastructure after the officers and directors of Calgary-based Houston Oil & Gas Ltd. laid off their staff and contractors, shut down the company, and walked away from their responsibility to clean up after themselves.

UK Organizes Citizens’ Assembly to Discuss Climate Action

A cross-party group of UK members of parliament is writing to 30,000 households across the country, inviting them to participate in a citizens’ assembly on climate change.

‘Unprecedented’ Antarctic Warming Spells Trouble for Emperor Penguins

With Antarctica warming at “unprecedented” rates, British researchers are calling for much stronger efforts to protect the emperor penguin, as the sea ice upon which the birds depend for their breeding and molting cycles grows ever more uncertain in depth and duration.

Colossal Fossils ‘Will Have Some Explaining to Do’ as Quarterly Profits Plunge 42%

Financial media are predicting a devastating run of corporate reports from some of the world’s biggest fossil companies, with low oil prices, weak customer demand, and shrinking profit margins on chemical production hitting an industry whose investors are looking for higher payouts on their shares.

U.S., Australia Refuse to Pitch In as 27 Countries Pledge $9.8 Billion to Green Climate Fund

More than 27 countries, excluding the United States, promised US$9.8 billion to the United Nations Green Climate Fund (GCF) by the end of a two-day pledging conference last week in Paris, aimed at beginning the process of replenishing the badly-depleted fund.

India Plans 55 Gigawatts of New Solar, Wind Development Along Border with Pakistan

India is planning 55 gigawatts of new solar and wind development along its often contentious border with Pakistan, according to a dispatch last week by Agence France-Presse.

Thawing Arctic Tundra Emits 600 Megatonnes More Carbon Per Year Than It Absorbs

Thawing Arctic permafrost is now emitting 600 million tonnes more carbon each year than its resident plants like lichen and wild blueberry can absorb in summer, according to research just published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Vermont’s Green Mountain Power Announces Fossil Divestment

370,000 Australians Sign E-Petition in Two Days After Government Blocks Climate Emergency Declaration

In the two days after Australia’s climate-denying Liberal coalition government blocked a motion to declare a climate emergency in the country, 370,000 citizens signed a record-breaking e-petition urging their government to ring the fire alarm on climate.

Warming Could Drive Up Risk of Ebola Epidemics in Africa

The risk of Ebola epidemics in Africa—especially in less-developed countries with high birth rates—will increase significantly if the world does not act aggressively to rein in global warming, according to a new paper in the journal Nature Communications.

‘Tectonic Shift’ in Swiss Elections Sees Green Parties Gain as Climate Concern Mounts

Switzerland’s Green Party is declaring a “tectonic shift” after seeing a six-point jump in its popular vote, to 13.2%, in national elections in which concerns about climate change took centre stage.

http://www.greenpeace.org/canada/en/campaigns/Energy/tarsands/

Norway’s Biggest Pension Fund Dumps All Tar Sands/Oil Sands Investment

Norway’s biggest pension fund, Kommunal Landspensjonskasse (KLP), has sold off US$58 million in stocks and bonds in Canadian tar sands/oil sands companies and declared it won’t back companies that draw more than 5% of their revenue from bitumen production.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Shanghaiairpollutionsunset.jpg

Dozens of Countries Agree to Tackle Short-Lived Climate Pollutants

Faster, more coordinated reductions in short-lived climate pollutants (SLPCs) may be one of the lower-profile but more important results of last week’s United Nations Climate Summit in New York, after environment ministers from dozens of countries agreed to focus on a class of greenhouse gases that has mostly been overlooked so far in international climate agreements, InsideClimate News reports.

First Nations, Landowners, Local Governments File Objections to Trans Mountain Pipeline Route

Construction of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion could be held up by objections from dozens of First Nations, landowners, and local governments along the route, the Globe and Mail reports.

New Models Put Warming at 6.5 °to 7.0°C by 2100 Without Fast Action to Cut Carbon

Average global warming could hit 6.5° to 7.0°C by 2100, up to two degrees higher than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)’s latest scenarios, if humanity doesn’t get its greenhouse gas emissions under control, according to new modelling by two leading research agencies in France.

Ecojustice Threatens Legal Action Over Alberta’s ‘Foreign Interference’ Inquiry

Ecojustice is giving Alberta 30 days to respond to concerns about its C$2.5-million inquiry into supposed foreign interference in the province’s fossil sector, asserting the probe is “unlawful and potentially unconstitutional” in its current form.

New Analysis Shows ‘Enormous Area’ of the Earth Above 2.0°C

Some of the planet’s hot spots are already above the temperature agreed by scientists and politicians as the maximum allowable to prevent a disastrous climate crisis, Climate News Network reports, in a summary of a detailed and evocative analysis from a team led by Washington Post climate specialist Chris Mooney.

Extreme Weather Displaces a Record Seven Million People in First Six Months of 2019

A record seven million people were displaced from their homes by extreme weather in the first half of this year, marking 2019 as “one of the most disastrous years in almost two decades” before Hurricane Dorian hit the Bahamas or the rest of the Atlantic hurricane season got under way, the New York Times reports.

New Study Shows Solar Meeting 40% of Global Power Demand, Wind 30% by 2050

Solar is on track to become the world’s biggest source of electricity by 2035 as renewable energy costs continue to fall, making it easier to electrify previously stubborn sectors like transportation and construction, according to the fourth in a series of annual analyses published by renewable energy company Statkraft.

Toronto Stock Exchange May Dump Seven Canadian Fossils Over Low Share Prices

Plummeting share values may soon drive up to seven small Canadian fossil companies out of the Standard & Poors/Toronto Stock Exchange Composite Index, a key listing that brings businesses to the attention of investors who might consider buying their stocks, according to a list of potential deletions published by analysts at AltaCorp Capital.

Renewables Investment to Hit $2.6 Trillion from 2010-2019

Global renewable energy investment is on track to hit US$2.6 trillion in this decade, according to a Bloomberg New Energy Finance study released last week by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the Frankfurt School’s UNEP Collaborating Centre for Climate & Sustainable Energy Finance.

Trans Mountain Wouldn’t Respond Fast Enough to Burnaby Mountain Tank Farm Fire, Federal Regulator Concludes

Trans Mountain Corporation won’t be able to respond fast enough if one of the bitumen storage tanks in its massive Burnaby Mountain tank farm boils over and spills, according to an audit completed in May by the National Energy Board, before it was replaced by the new Canada Energy Regulator.

India’s Rajasthan State Plans 50 GW of New Solar Capacity by 2025

The state government in Rajasthan, India has laid out a plan to install 50 gigawatts of solar capacity by 2025 and establish itself as a global solar hub, PV Magazine reports, in a post republished by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).

Whales, Salmon, Sea Lions at Risk in West Coast Ocean Heat Wave

Whales, salmon, and sea lions are at risk as an ocean heat wave takes shape off the west coast of North America, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) warned in a recent blog post.

Australian Agency Downgrades Great Barrier Reef Status from ‘Poor’ to ‘Very Poor’

An Australian government agency has downgraded its outlook for the Great Barrier Reef to “very poor” for the first time, shining a light on what the Financial Times describes as a “fierce battle between environmental campaigners and the government over the country’s approach to climate change”.

One-Third of Fort McMurray High Schoolers Show Signs of PTSD

More than one-third of high school students in Fort McMurray are showing signs of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), three years after the wildfire known as The Beast tore through their home town and forced many of them to escape by road through a wall of surrounding flames.

The 12-Year Target: How a 2030 Goal Became a Proxy for Deeper Decarbonization (and More Detailed Science)

The oft-cited 2030 deadline to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by 45% is actually a stepping stone to the even more significant goal of total decarbonization by mid-century, InsideClimate News reports, in a review of the science behind a target date that has been cited frequently in the race for the U.S. Democratic Party’s 2020 presidential nomination.

Danish Pension Fund Dumps Shares in 10 Colossal Fossils, Citing Failure to Meet Paris Goals

Denmark’s $20-billion MP Pension fund is selling off its shares in 10 of the world’s most colossal fossils, after concluding they aren’t serious enough about meeting their responsibilities under the 2015 Paris Agreement.

Bold Nebraska, Ponca Tribe Undeterred as State Supreme Court Approves Keystone XL Route

Bold Nebraska, Nebraska landowners, and tribal nations are vowing to carry on their fight against the Keystone XL pipeline, after the state Supreme Court upheld a November, 2017 route approval by the Nebraska Public Service Commission (PSC).

Alberta Fossil Buys Kinder Morgan Canada, Shows Less Interest in Trans Mountain

The Calgary-based pipeliner that bought Kinder Morgan Canada this week says it isn’t keen to make a bid for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, given the “noise” associated with the now taxpayer-owned project.

Free Speech at Risk, Fossil Lobbyist Touts Success as Nine U.S. States Declare Pipeline Protest a Felony

Campaign groups and constitutional lawyers are raising concerns about free speech and a fossil lobbyist is bragging about his success, after nine U.S. states adopted laws at the behest of the fossil and chemical industries that make it a felony to engage in peaceful anti-pipeline protests.

Trans Mountain Pipeline Protester’s Donor Appeal Hits High Gear on GoFundMe

A donor appeal for British Columbia poet and university professor Rita Wong, sentenced to 28 days in prison for her part in protesting the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, is trending on the GoFundMe crowdfunding page, with 225 people contributing $16,765 in just three days (as of Tuesday evening).

Royal Bank of Scotland Phases Out Funding for Tar Sands/Oil Sands, Arctic and Antarctic Refuge Drilling

The Royal Bank of Scotland is phasing out financing for tar sands/oil sands exploration and extraction, and limiting its funding for fossil projects in the Arctic and Antarctic.

Water Shortages in 17 Countries Put One-Quarter of Global Population at Risk

From India to Iran to Botswana, the New York Times is out with text and graphics that illustrate the 17 countries, home to one-quarter of the world’s population, that are at increasingly urgent risk of running out of water, according to new data from the World Resources Institute (WRI).

Time for Australia to ‘Answer to the Pacific’, New Zealand PM Asserts

With 18 Pacific Island nations pressing Australia to agree to a global coal phaseout, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is urging Scott Morrison’s climate-denying Liberal coalition to “answer to the Pacific” on the climate crisis.

Massive Arctic Heat Wave Produces Record Ice Melt in Greenland, Wildfires in Siberia

Caught up in the harrowing fallout from the planet’s hottest July—and June—on record, Greenland shed a mind-boggling 10 billion tonnes of ice in a single day, while Siberia lost a Belgium-sized section of its boreal forests to monster wildfires that have sent emissions soaring.

European Investment Bank Promises Fossil Funding Phaseout in 2020

In a move that Oil Change International is hailing as a “massive step forward in climate leadership”, the European Investment Bank (EIB) announced late last month that it will cut off the billions of euros per year that it invests in fossil fuel projects by the end of next year.

July Likely to Be Hottest Month Since Record-Keeping Began in 1880

With another week still go to in the month, dozens of climate experts are already predicting that heat waves covering North America, Europe, and the Arctic will make July 2019 the hottest month since record-keeping began in 1880.

António Guterres

Guterres Asks Countries to Plan for Carbon Neutrality by 2050

United Nations Secretary General António Guterrres is laying down a two-week deadline for countries to sketch out their plans to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050, ahead of formal announcements at the climate summit he’s scheduled to host in New York City September 23.

India Renewables Capacity On Track to Overshoot Paris Target by 60%

India is on track to overshoot a key Paris Agreement target by nearly 60% by obtaining close to two-thirds of its installed electricity capacity from renewable sources by 2030, according to a new report from the country’s Central Electricity Authority (CEA).

Early Fossil Plant Shutdowns Will be Needed to Hit 1.5°C Average Warming Target

The world already has enough fossil fuel plants and high-emitting industrial facilities, buildings, and cars to drive average global warming above a 1.5°C threshold, according to an article earlier this month in the journal Nature.

First Nations Challenge Trans Mountain in Court While Conservation Group Questions Project Viability

Six British Columbia First Nations have petitioned the Federal Court of Appeal to review Ottawa’s re-approval of the C$9.3-billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, with Tsleil-Waututh Nation Chief Leah George-Wilson maintaining last week the Trudeau government was “non-responsive” to concerns communities raised during the last round of court-mandated consultations about the project.

Record Arctic Heat Produces Wildfires, Health Alerts in Alaska and Beyond

A record heat wave across Alaska and much of the Arctic is thawing tundra and sucking moisture out of circumpolar forests and peat bogs, triggering wildfires and choking, black smoke that are starting earlier, burning hotter, and spreading farther north than they have before.

Ocean Acidification Could Drive Mass Extinction Without Rapid Drop in CO2 Emissions

Ocean acidification driven by ever-increasing carbon dioxide levels could take on a life of its own and begin driving a sudden, mass extinction if emissions are not brought under control by the year 2100, according to a new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Conservation Groups Appeal Trans Mountain Approval on Behalf of Endangered B.C. Orcas

The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is headed back to court, with the Raincoast Conservation Foundation and the Living Oceans Society asking an appeal court to rule that the federal cabinet failed to protect British Columbia’s endangered southern resident orca population when it re-approved the controversial, C$9.3-billion project.

China Tips Plans for Faster Carbon Cuts as Severe Weather Impacts Mount

China announced plans last weekend to finalize new, tougher carbon reduction targets that reflect the “highest possible ambition” to combat the climate crisis, just days before government forecasters linked a series of extreme weather events sweeping the country to a changing climate.

Project Reconciliation Promises $6.9-Billion Trans Mountain Bid as Early as Next Week

The Indigenous-led Project Reconciliation is expected to announce a C$6.9-billion bid for majority ownership of the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline as early as next week, with the group’s leadership promising a proposal that will “work for all sides”.

Scientists Scramble to Understand Sudden Drop in Antarctic Sea Ice

Researchers startled by a sudden nosedive in Antarctic sea ice since 2014—at a rate that makes current Arctic melting look slow by comparison—are pointing to the likelihood of further accelerated melting at both poles as yet another reason to limit average global warming to 1.5ºC.

Scientists Debate Whether Revised Temperature History Reduces Available Carbon Budget

A recent revision of sea surface temperature records from the mid-20th century to the present has scientists and policy-makers considering whether the carbon budget to keep average global warming to 1.5°C should be revised downwards by as much as a third—and questioning researchers whether the update is relevant to the climate impact communities actually experience on the front lines of the crisis.

Trillion-Dollar UK Investor Group Dumps Exxon, Four Others from Some Funds

Overlapping ‘Downstream Disruptors’ Spell Troubles for Fossil Exploration and Development

Oil and gas exploration companies are facing down a half-dozen simultaneous, overlapping threats to their financial success, according to two recent stories in the Rigzone industry newsletter.

G-20 Adopts Modest Climate Statement as Trump Stumbles, Japan Grapples with Coal

Leaders of the G-20 industrial economies held their ground against Trump administration climate denial at the end of their annual meeting in Osaka, Japan Saturday, adopting a watered down statement on the climate crisis that fell short of what was needed but still committed to continuing action to implement that 2015 Paris Agreement.

New Government in Denmark Aims for 70% Carbon Reduction by 2030

A 70% greenhouse gas reduction by 2030 is on the agenda for Denmark, after the country’s centre-left Social Democrats reached a deal with three other parties that will enable them to form a minority government.

Poorest Will Face ‘Climate Apartheid’ if Crisis Deepens, Rule of Law Crumbles

Near-universal failure to acknowledge the magnitude of the climate crisis risks setting the stage for an era of “climate apartheid,” in which private wealth becomes the only guarantor of (relative) well-being and positive social forces like democracy and the rule of law crumble, warns a recent United Nations report.

Europe Bakes as Early Summer Heat Wave Drive Temperatures Above 40°C

With nighttime temperatures exceeding 30°C in Madrid and weekend day temperatures expected to soar far above normal for June in many cities across their continent, Europeans are struggling to keep hydrated and cool, while officials work to staff hospitals and warn of “extreme” forest fire risk

http://www.greenpeace.org/canada/en/campaigns/Energy/tarsands/

Zurich Insurance Drops Tar Sands/Oil Sands, Pipelines and Rail, Commits to 100% RE by 2022

The world’s 23rd-largest insurance company, Zurich Insurance Group, has become the world’s first to withdraw insurance and investment from companies significantly involved with the tar sands/oil sands, including pipelines and railways, as well as coal developers, utilities, and oil shale developers.

Saudi Arabia Obstructs UN Adoption of IPCC’s 1.5°C Pathway Report

Countries participating in mid-year climate negotiations in Bonn this month are at risk of excluding the IPCC’s landmark report on 1.5°C pathways from their consideration of climate science, with alarmed health professionals calling out Saudi Arabia for its continuing refusal to accept the conclusions in the October, 2018 special report.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_power_in_the_Netherlands

Norway Plans 3.5 GW of New Offshore Wind, 50% Cut in Marine Diesel by 2030

A proposal to build up to 3.5 gigawatts of offshore wind capacity, coupled with a pledge to cut marine diesel use 50% by 2030, have Norway pushing for a lead in subsidy-free renewable energy while driving down its demand for the energy source that has long driven its economy.

Line 3 Pipeline Faces Six-Month Delay in Minnesota While Line 5 Loses Traction in Michigan

With this week’s federal re-approval of the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline expansion triggering outrage and likely legal action across the country, two other pending pipelines—Line 3 through Minnesota, and Line 5 through Michigan—were running into new regulatory and political roadblocks south of the Canada-U.S. border.

South Pacific Islands Lead Fight for Faster Carbon Cuts as UN Prepares for September Summit

South Pacific islands whose very existence is imperiled by climate change continue to use the “moral force” of their endangerment to build consensus on the imperative for swift climate action. With two weeks of mid-year climate negotiations under way in Bonn, Germany, and a United Nations special summit on climate coming up in September, Time Magazine is out with a timely recap of their progress since the 2015 conference that adopted the Paris Agreement.

Dengue Risk to Hit Two Billion More People in 2080 Unless Carbon Emissions Are Curtailed

Based on a warming scenario “roughly representative of the world’s current emissions trajectory,” more than two billion additional people will be at risk of dengue fever by 2080, within its current geographic range and well beyond, according to a study just published in the journal Nature Microbiology.

Austria Speeds Up Coal Phaseout to 2020

Austria’s electricity system will be free of coal next year, after power utility EVN announced late last month that it will shut down its 405-megawatt Dürnrohr plant in the Zwentendorf district five years ahead of schedule.

Oceans Could Lose 17% of Biomass by 2100 Unless GHG Emissions Are Brought Under Control

The world’s oceans could lose 17% of their biomass by 2100 if humanity fails to get greenhouse gas emissions under control, representing a devastating blow to biodiversity and a terrifying reduction in a resource base upon which much of humanity ultimately depends.

Annual Peace Index Cites Climate Change as ‘Tipping Point’ for Conflict

Climate change will threaten peace in countries around the world in the next decade, according to the latest edition of an annual index produced by Australia’s Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP).

India Bakes Under Stifling Heat Wave as Data Show Warming Trend

Much of the Indian subcontinent was blanketed in a stifling heat wave last week, with five of the 15 hottest places on the planet located in India or Pakistan and the northern town of Churu hitting a high of 50°C (122°F) on Monday.

Chile Shuts Eight Coal Plants, Sets 2040 Deadline for 100% RE

Chile is planning to close eight coal plants with combined capacity of 23,000 megawatts, or 20% of its electricity, as part of a new commitment to hit a 100% renewable energy target by 2040.

Study Predicts End of Civilization by 2050 if Global Warming Hits 3.0°C

An alarming new study by Australia’s Breakthrough National Centre for Climate Restoration is pointing to the “high likelihood of human civilization coming to an end” by 2050—with the all-important caveat that that’s the outcome to expect if humanity fails to take action on the climate emergency and get greenhouse gas emissions under control.

World’s Dirtiest Air, Cheapest Solar Produce Challenge and Opportunity for Modi’s Second Term

The world’s dirtiest air and its lowest prices for installed solar will be two of the influences shaping Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s second term of office in India, according to news reports circulating around the time of his swearing-in last week.

Grid Flexibility Would Enable 80% Renewable Power Generation by 2050

Grid flexibility places #77 on Drawdown’s list of climate solutions as an essential tool for making 80% renewable generation “a global reality” by 2050. Its costs and savings are impossible to calculate, as they will be embedded in local renewable energy projects around the globe.

António Guterres

80 Countries to Announce Tougher Climate Targets at UN Summit in September

About 80 countries are on track to announce tougher greenhouse gas reduction targets during United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres’ climate summit this September, a UN official said Tuesday, the same day that Guterres warned that fossil fuel subsidies are helping “to destroy the world”.

Global Solar Set to Surge, But Still Falls Short of Paris Targets

The solar industry is expecting a continuing surge in the years ahead, according to two reports released earlier this month, though the rapid growth still falls short of what will be needed to keep average global warming below the minimum international target of 2.0°C.

China Boosts Unsubsidized Renewables But Storms Ahead with Coal Production, Air Pollution

While China is surging ahead with more than 20 billion watts of unsubsidized renewable energy, the country is also seeing alarming increases in coal consumption, coal-driven air pollution, and emissions of an ozone-destroying chemical that was banned in 2012.

More Countries Put Up Barriers as Migrants Flee Climate Chaos

With many governments still dragging their feet on climate action, many are also actively preparing—via militarized borders and regressive immigration policies—for one of its most dire and tragic consequences: refugees fleeing climate-driven conflict, desertification, and sea level rise.

India Set to Exceed Paris Target, Install 80 GW of New Renewables in Five Years

India is on track to boost non-fossil energy to 45% of its electricity generation by 2022, well beyond its Paris Agreement commitment of 40%, according to a new assessment by the Moody’s credit rating agency.

Stop New Coal Plants by 2020, Cut Fossil Subsidies, UN Secretary General Urges

United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres is calling on countries to stop new coal plant construction by 2020, accelerate the shutdown of existing facilities, and “tax carbon, not people” in order to avert the “total disaster” that will occur if climate change is not brought under control.

Trump Organization Must Hit Building Retrofit Deadline or Face Millions in New York City Fines

Donald Trump’s refusal to confront the climate crisis will soon prove costly to his stumbling business empire, with a number of his New York City properties in line to be heavily fined if they are not rapidly retrofitted to reduce their currently sky-high level of emissions.

Vietnam Aims to Boost Non-Hydro Renewables, Avert Climate Impacts That Would ‘Destroy 30 Million Livelihoods’

With hydroelectric resources maxed out and coal reserves in decline, Vietnam is seeking to mobilize its significant wind and solar potential—and the requisite investment of roughly US$8 billion.

Low-Carbon Investment Must Grow 250% by 2030 to Hit Paris Targets: IEA

Low-carbon energy investment must increase 250% by 2030 if countries are to meet their targets under the 2015 Paris Agreement, the International Energy Agency warned this week.

Nebraska Flooding Points to Spill Risk from Keystone XL

The “bomb cyclone”-driven flooding across the midwestern United States has become the latest in a litany of arguments against construction of the US$8-billion Keystone XL pipeline, with a Nebraska farmer, former oilfield worker, and avowed Republican pointing out that the rising waters could have triggered a spill on his property if the pipeline had been in place.

Pressure Mounts for Emission Cuts, Speed Reductions in International Shipping

With a key International Maritime Organization (IMO) committee meeting in London this week to address pollution and greenhouse gas emissions on the high seas, environmental groups are warning that the UN agency is off-course in the effort to align the industry with a 1.5°C world.

Alberta Carbon Tax Repeal Will Have ‘No Bearing’ on Trans Mountain Decision, Trudeau Says

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney is on the verge of tabling a bill that will cancel his province’s carbon tax by the end of the month, a move that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says will have “no bearing” on whether the federal government re-approves the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Atmospheric CO2 Hits 415.26 PPM, Highest Level Since Humans Evolved

Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide were measured at 415.26 parts per million (ppm) on Saturday, believed to be the highest level since humans first evolved.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symbols_of_Europe

EU Posts 2.5% Emissions Cut in 2018

While global greenhouse gas emissions increased by 1.7% in 2018, driven largely by China, India, and the United States, the European Union fared better, with early estimates from Eurostat indicating a 2.5% drop in 2018 CO2 emissions compared to 2017.

China, Japan, South Korea Fund Coal Plants Elsewhere, But Not in Their Own Back Yards

China, Japan, and South Korea are financing dozens of new coal plants in the developing countries of southeast Asia and Africa, while more than 100 of the region’s financial institutions back away from supporting similar projects on their home turf.

Bolsonaro Axes Head of Brazil Forum for Climate Change

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has fired the self-described “militant environmentalist” at the helm of his country’s Forum for Climate Change, after the group began organizing a dozen state governments to set up their own climate policy council, independent of the federal government.

Ireland Declares Climate Emergency

Ireland has become the second country, after the United Kingdom, to declare a climate emergency, with Climate Action Minister Richard Bruton warning that “things will deteriorate very rapidly unless we move very swiftly, and the window of opportunity to do that is fast closing.”

Canada On Track to Re-Approve Trans Mountain, But Northern Gateway Restart Looks Unlikely

Canada is likely to re-approve the controversial Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion, but a resurrection of Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline plan is not in the cards, according to two separate news reports this week.

Studies Show Accelerating Ice Loss in Greenland, New Threat to Antarctica’s Ross Ice Shelf

The rate of ice loss in Greenland has sped up massively, from 51 billion tons in the 1980s to 286 billion tons between 2010 and 2018, according to a study based on nearly a half-century of data published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Climate Hawks Demand Real Action After UK Adopts Climate Emergency Resolution

The British House of Commons has endorsed a motion by Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn declaring a formal climate and environmental emergency, after Conservative Members of Parliament were instructed not to oppose the measure.

UK Parliament Could Become First National Legislature to Declare Climate Emergency

The United Kingdom will become the first country in the world to declare a climate emergency this week if the House of Commons supports a motion to be put forward by Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.

Sohi Makes No Promises as Liberals Weigh Delaying Trans Mountain Pipeline Reapproval

Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi says there is no guarantee the federal cabinet will reapprove the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline expansion ahead of the federal election this fall, and a national columnist reports Ottawa is getting serious about holding up the project if incoming Alberta premier Jason Kenney rescinds his province’s promise to cap carbon pollution from the tar sands/oil sands.

Solar Water Heating Would Save 6.08 Gigatons of Carbon by 2050

Solar water heating ranks #41 on Drawdown’s list of climate solutions. It could eliminate 6.08 gigatons of carbon dioxide by 2050 at a net cost of US$3 billion, resulting in net savings of $773.7 million.

Independent Data Confirms Warming Trend, as Models Suggest Worse May Be Ahead

A recent review of satellite data is confirming that the Earth is already warming, possibly somewhat faster in the highest latitudes than previously believed, while new modelling suggests a warming surge may be on the horizon.

Shipping Efficiency Would Save 7.9 Gigatons of Carbon by 2050

Increasing transport ship efficiency places #32 on Drawdown’s list of climate solutions. Efficiency gains of 50% across the sector, at a net cost of US$915.9 billion, could prevent 7.9 gigatons of CO2 emissions by 2050, while saving the international marine industry US$1 trillion in fuel costs over the life of the vessels.

Northern Holland Installing World’s Biggest Floating Solar System

A company in The Netherlands has begun work on the world’s largest floating solar installation, a network of 73,500 panels on 15 islands on the Andijk reservoir in northern Holland that will have the ability to track the sun as it crosses the sky.

Central Bank Execs Stress Financial Sector’s Role in Addressing Climate Change

It’s time for central banks and the wider financial community to set clear, measurable goals for building a smooth transition to a low-carbon economy, 34 of the world’s biggest central banks declared last week, in the first comprehensive report by the Network for Greening the Financial System (NGFS).

Canada Reports Greenhouse Gas Emissions Increase for 2017

Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions increased marginally in 2017, from 708 to 716 million tonnes, driven mostly by increased oil and gas production, according to the national inventory the country filed this week with the United Nations climate secretariat.

Micro Wind Would Save 200 Megatons of Carbon by 2050

Micro wind places #76 on Drawdown’s list of climate solutions. If its share of global electricity generation increases to 1%, it could eliminate 0.2 gigatons of carbon dioxide at a cost of $US36.1 billion, against savings of $19.9 billion.

Fossils ‘Surprised and Disappointed’ as Norway Turns Against Lofoten Islands Oil Drilling

Norwegian fossils declared themselves “surprised and disappointed” last week after the opposition Labour Party, the biggest voting bloc in the national parliament, withdrew its support for offshore oil and gas exploration in the environmentally sensitive Lofoten Islands.

Climate-Vulnerable Countries Plan New Tools to Fund Green Development

With at least a billion people in developing countries facing serious risk as the climate warms, the 48 members of the Vulnerable Twenty Group of Ministers of Finance (V20) is introducing a new set of tools to free up more funds at less cost for green development.

Investment Houses See Climate Targets Undercutting Fossils, Warming Above 2.0°C Boosting Financial Risk

Continued fossil industry development came under increased pressure from investors over the last week, with a major fund manager concluding that climate targets could undercut global oil demand by the mid-2020s and one of the world’s biggest investment advisors warning of trouble ahead if global climate goals are missed.

http://www.greenpeace.org/canada/en/campaigns/Energy/tarsands/

Expect ‘Flood of Litigation’ if Bill C-69 is Watered Down, Athabasca First Nations Warn

Canada will face a “flood of litigation” if the Trudeau government’s proposed Impact Assessment Act, Bill C-69, is watered down, four First Nations chiefs from the Alberta tar sands/oil sands region warned last week in testimony to a travelling Senate committee.

Two New Studies Trace Massive Glacier Loss Linked to Climate Change

North America accounts for more than half of the 369 billion tons of snow and ice the world’s glaciers are losing each year, and the Alps are on track to see two-thirds of their glacier ice melt by 2100, according to two different studies released this week.

Renewables Make Decarbonization $15 Trillion Cheaper, Promise $160 Trillion in Savings by 2050

The plummeting cost of solar and wind farms, coupled with government policies driving faster electrification, has cut the cost of reaching global climate goals by US$15 trillion in the last year, concludes a report issued this week by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).

Alberta Oil Well Cleanup Costs Could Hit $70 Billion

The cost of cleaning up Alberta’s old and unproductive oil wells could max out at C$70 billion, according to a new report by a consortium of landowners and scientists that used data from the Alberta Energy Regulator (AER) to come up with its estimate.

Alberta Officials Took 12 Hours to Notify First Nation of Potentially Toxic Hydrogen Sulphide Leak

When a cloud of toxic chemicals began wafting toward the First Nations hamlet of Fort McKay from Syncrude Canada’s Mildred Lake tar sands/oil sands plant 10 kilometres away, it took officials 12 hours to notify the community—a massive health and safety failure that critics blame on the fossil industry’s takeover of regulatory oversight in the Alberta oilpatch.

Pipeline Opponents File Lawsuit Against Trump’s Latest Keystone XL Permit

Pipeline opponents were back in U.S. federal court last Friday, contending that Donald Trump acted illegally when he issued a new permit for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline in defiance of a previous court order.

Mass Bleaching Drives Down Replenishment of Great Barrier Reef Corals by 89%

The replenishment of new corals on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef crashed 89% in a mass bleaching “event” in 2016 and 2017 triggered by climate change, and also produced a shift in the coral species on the reef, according to a new study in the journal Nature.

Alternative Cement Would Save 6.69 Gigatons of Carbon by 2050

Alternative cement places #36 on Drawdown’s list of climate solutions, with the potential to avoid 6.69 gigatons of atmospheric carbon dioxide by 2050. The shift would save US$174 billion, because such alternatives ultimately last longer.

Long-Delayed Emergency Warning for Steelhead Trout Has Implications for Trans Mountain Pipeline

The federal government has spent more than year considering an emergency warning from scientists that pits endangered steelhead trout, and their importance to the Coldwater Indian Band in southern interior British Columbia, against Ottawa’s determination to push ahead with construction of the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Climate-Induced Warming Harms Food Chains by Leaving Insects ‘No Place to Hide’

Overheating is just as hazardous to insects in shaded woodlands as it is in open grasslands, meaning they receive no respite from climate-induced warming, according to a new study from the UK that points to possible impacts on food chains that depend on the smaller creatures.

Global Coal Plant Construction ‘Collapses’, But China Considers Massive New Buildout

The introduction of new coal-fired power plants around the world has entered a “collapse” over the last three years, although the China Electricity Council is considering a proposal for a massive new buildout.

Midwestern U.S. Loses Hundreds of Miles of Levees After ‘Bomb Cyclone’ Flooding

Severe flooding across midwestern U.S. states like Nebraska, Iowa, and Missouri has taken out hundreds of miles of levees, leaving officials to compare the failed system to Swiss cheese, on the heels of mid-March “bomb cyclone” storm conditions that inundated more than a million acres (405,000 hectares) of farmland.

Australian Farmers Face Suicide Risk as Multi-Year Drought Turns from ‘Crisis’ to ‘Marathon’

A brutal, multi-year drought brought on by climate change is taking its toll on the mental health of Australia’s farmers, just as it has in India, leading to higher suicide rates as farm incomes and the communities that depend on them suffer.

Business, Investment Leaders Demand IEA Scenarios that Drive Toward 1.5°C

It’s high time for the International Energy Agency to develop future scenarios that show a reasonable prospect of keeping average global warming to 1.5°C, while taking a precautionary approach to so-called negative emission technologies, a group of more than 40 business leaders, investors, and energy specialists asserts in a letter released this week by Oil Change International.

‘Ecological Turmoil’ of Ocean Heat Wave Produces Six-Year Drop in Australian Dolphin Population

A single, extreme heat wave in Shark Bay, Australia spanning two months in 2011 drove down the local bottlenose dolphin population by 12% over the six years that followed, leading to a decline in dolphin calf births and suggesting “that the ecological consequences of extreme weather events may be too sudden or disruptive for even highly adaptable animals to respond,” concludes a new study in the journal Current Biology.

Sustainable Investments Grow 34% Over Two Years, with Climate as Prime Motivator

Sustainable investments around the world grew 34% over the last two years to US$30.7 trillion, with financial professionals pointing to climate change as a leading motivator for investors, according to the latest in a series of biennial analyses by the Global Sustainable Investment Alliance.

C-69 Would Deliver More Timely, Credible Decisions, Impact Assessment Specialist Argues

The federal government’s embattled Impact Assessment Act, Bill C-69, would actually deliver more credible project decisions, better consideration of economic factors, and more timely, effective consultations than its Harper-era predecessor, despite the relentless battering it has received from the Canadian fossil lobby, veteran impact assessment specialist Robert B. Gibson writes in a post for Policy Options.

Lookback from 2050: NPR Essay Shows How We Got Climate Change Under Control

It’s 2050. We’ve got climate change under control. And we got the job done through mass electrification, reimagining cities, protecting forests, and changing the way cows are fed.

Svalbard’s ‘Doomsday’ Seed Vault in Trouble Due to Rapid Arctic Warming

The Global Seed Vault in Norway, intended as “the ultimate failsafe for biodiversity of crops,” is now threatened by rapid warming in Longyearbyen, the town on the island of Svalbard that is the world’s northernmost community with 1,000 or more residents.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waste_heat

UBS Bans Project-Level Finance for New Coal Plants

Swiss banking giant UBS has adopted new lending guidelines that ban project-level finance for new coal-fired generating stations around the world.

Trump Issues New Keystone Permit in Defiance of Montana Court Ruling

Two major oil pipelines between Canada and the United States are running into renewed legal hurdles, with Donald Trump making what appears to be a futile bid to reissue a presidential permit for the Keystone XL project and Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer halting construction on an underwater tunnel for the Line 5 line.

Analysts Raise Eyebrows After Exxon ‘Re-Books’ 3.2 Billion Barrels of Tar Sands/Oil Sands Reserves

ExxonMobil is running into some second-guessing from analysts after bringing 3.2 billion barrels of tar sands/oil sands crude back into its active reserves.

Electric Bikes Would Save 960 Megatonnes of Carbon by 2050

Electric bikes place #69 on Drawdown’s list of climate solutions. They can eliminate 0.96 gigatons of carbon dioxide emissions by 2050 at a cost of $US106.8 billion, with net savings of $226.1 billion.

Line 3 Gains Final Approval from Minnesota PUC

The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) voted unanimously Tuesday to quash all remaining petitions against Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline and grant it final approval, setting the company up to complete final regulatory steps for the controversial project by the end of 2019.

Climate Disaster Losses Could Undermine Financial System Stability, U.S. Federal Bank Exec Warns

Economic losses from natural disasters and other climate impacts could produce enough risk to undermine the security of the financial system, according to a research letter released Monday by Glenn D. Rudebusch, a senior policy advisor and executive vice president with the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

CO2 Emissions Rise 1.7% in 2018 as Energy Demand Sets Record, Coal Consumption Grows

Global carbon dioxide emissions increased 1.7% in 2018, driven by record-high energy demand and still-increasing use of coal-fired power plants, the International Energy Agency reported yesterday.

Rising Premiums Due to Severe Weather Could ‘Threaten Social Order’, Insurers Warn

The world’s biggest reinsurer, Munich Re, is warning that climate change may soon turn rising insurance costs into a pressing social issue, as more frequent, severe weather puts rates beyond the reach of most households.

Humanitarian Disaster in Mozambique Points to ‘Fundamental Injustice of Climate Change’

With thousands of people in Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Malawi still in need of rescue in the aftermath of Cyclone Idai, and nearly three million affected, meteorologist and Grist climate writer Eric Holthaus is pointing to the massive natural and humanitarian disaster as an example of the “fundamental injustice of climate change”.

Researchers Scramble to Understand Environmental Health Impacts of Climate Disasters

As wildfires and other climate-driven natural disasters become more frequent and severe, scientists are scrambling to understand the human and animal health hazards they leave behind.

Home Water Efficiency Would Save 4.61 Gigatons of Carbon by 2050

Water saving in the home places #46 on Drawdown’s list of climate solutions. It can eliminate 4.61 gigatons of carbon dioxide emissions by 2050 at a net cost of $US72.44 billion, producing net savings of $1.8 trillion, based solely on energy savings from more efficient use of hot water.

New Laws Aim to Protect Environment, Not Stop Trans Mountain, B.C. Tells Appeal Court

British Columbia has the right to pass environmental laws to mitigate the harm that could result from the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, but it isn’t trying to stop the project outright, provincial lawyer Joseph Arvay told the B.C. Court of Appeal earlier this week.

Air Pollution Causes 8.8 Million Early Deaths Per Year, More Than Tobacco Smoking

Air pollution, most of it from fossil fuel burning, led to 8.8 million premature deaths world-wide and nearly 800,000 in Europe in 2015, almost double the previous estimate of 4.5 million and even more than the seven million per year caused by tobacco smoking.

‘Outstanding’ U.S. Appeals Court Ruling Delays Keystone XL by One Year

TransCanada Corporation’s $8-billion Keystone XL pipeline faces another year of delay after a U.S. appeal court denied its “urgent” motion, backed by Donald Trump’s state department, to lift an injunction blocking pre-construction activities.

Massive Arctic Warming Can Still Be Averted by Rapid GHG Cuts, Carbon Brief Concludes

Climate analysts are taking a second look at a key paragraph in a widely-reported study, published last week by the UN Environment Program, that appears to have overstepped with the claim that Arctic warming between 5.0 and 9.0°C is locked in and inevitable by 2080.

Resource Extraction Drives 53% of Carbon Emissions, 80% of Biodiversity Loss, UN Reports

Resource extraction, from fossil fuels and mining to food and biofuels, is responsible for more than half of global greenhouse gas emissions and 80% of biodiversity loss, according to a Global Resource Outlook released last week at the United Nations Environment Assembly in Nairobi, Kenya.

Doig: International Equity is the Key to Faster, Deeper Carbon Cuts

Hitting the Paris Agreement goal of keeping average global warming well below 1.5°C will depend on a “frank and open discussion on equity” that drives negotiators toward faster, deeper emission cuts and away from “conventional development paths,” argues Dr. Alison Doig, Head of Policy at Christian Aid, in a blog post published late last week.

Trump Climate Deregulation Could Boost U.S. Emissions by 200 Mt Per Year by 2025

Climate deregulation by the Trump administration could increase U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by more than 200 megatonnes per year by 2025, enough to “hobble global efforts to avoid the worst impacts of climate change,” Reuters reports.

Construction Boom Drives Up China’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions

China’s greenhouse gas emissions grew about 3% last year, despite rapid gains in clean energy production that couldn’t keep pace with surging demand for electricity.

Winter Rainfall Accelerates Melting of Greenland Ice Sheet

Rainfall is making the Greenland ice sheet melt more quickly, even during the long Arctic winter, concludes a new study in The Cryosphere, a journal of the European Geosciences Union.

MEG Energy Cancels Tar Sands/Oil Sands Expansion, Cites Line 3 Delay

Calgary-based MEG Energy Corporation is blaming a one-year delay in completing the controversial Line 3 pipeline for its decision to shut down expansion of its Christina Lake tar sands/oil sands project in northern Alberta.

Oceans ‘Spiking a Fever’ as Heatwaves Become More Frequent and Severe

A new paper in the journal Nature Climate Change says ocean heatwaves act like “wildfires that take out huge areas of forest” and are becoming much more frequent, killing off kelp, seagrass, and coral and imperiling an ecosystem humanity relies on for oxygen, food, storm protection, and atmospheric carbon removal.

411.66 PPM: Scientists Alarmed by Early Rise in Atmospheric CO2

Scientists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography are raising the alarm that the atmosphere has just hit a new peak in average carbon dioxide levels, at 411.66 part per million—not even because it’s a record, but because it was recorded three months before the time of year when CO2 concentrations normally reach their annual high.

NEB Sees Oil Decline in 2019 as Allan Warns of Stranded Assets in Alberta’s Future

The National Energy Board says Canada’s oil production is set to drop this year for the first time in a decade, and economist Robyn Allan warns that’s just the start of the transition challenge facing the Alberta economy.

Ocean Warming Leads to Declining Fish Stocks, with Developing Regions Hardest Hit

Ocean warming has delivered a significant decline in sustainable fish catches over the last century, but holding average global warming to 1.5°C would help protect future catches worth billions of dollars per year, according to two new studies.

Another Century of Fossil Use Could Eliminate Cloud Cover, Trigger 8.0°C of Additional Warming

A startling new study in the journal Nature Geoscience concludes that another century of burning fossil fuels at today’s levels could trigger the total loss of the world’s stratocumulus clouds and trigger another 8.0°C/14.0°F of global warming.

Report Links Climate Change to Majority of 2018’s Under-Reported Humanitarian Disasters

Climate change caused the majority of the world’s under-reported humanitarian disasters last year, and nine of the top 10 occurred in Africa, the Caribbean, and the Pacific, according to an analysis of more than a million online news stories released last week by CARE International.

Greta Thunberg

EU Chair Commits Billions to Climate Mitigation, Endorses Thunberg’s #SchoolStrike

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker promised an EU budget with billions of euros per year for climate change mitigation, in a speech he delivered in Brussels last week alongside Swedish school strike leader Greta Thunberg.

Alberta Oil-By-Rail Plan Could Block Grain Shipments, Farmers Warn

Alberta grain farmers are expressing serious concern about the province’s three-year, C$3.7-billion plan to ship oil by rail.

Alberta Spends $3.7 Billion for Three-Year Tanker Car Lease

Alberta will spend C$3.7 billion over three years to lease 4,400 tanker cars from CN and CP Rail, in order to ship up to 120,000 barrels of oil per day by rail, Premier Rachel Notley announced Tuesday.

Concentrated Solar Power Would Save 10.9 Gigatons of Carbon by 2050

Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) places #25 on Drawdown’s list of climate solutions. Scaling up CSP to 4.3% of global electricity production by 2050 would avoid 10.9 gigatons of carbon dioxide. While implementation costs of CSP are high, at US$1.3 trillion, net savings by 2050 could total $414 billion, with lifetime savings of $1.2 trillion.

Utilities Seek New Identity, Different Revenue Sources in Post-Carbon Economy

From rebranding themselves as “partners” in energy delivery, to renovating legacy infrastructure to accommodate electric vehicle charging, to redirecting into the business of “smart” homes, microgrids, and energy storage, utilities are working overtime to reinvent themselves for a post-carbon world.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Featured_picture_candidates/Barrow_Offshore_Wind_Farm

World’s Biggest Offshore Wind Farm Delivers First Power to UK Grid

The world’s biggest offshore wind farm was expected to begin delivering power to the United Kingdom grid this week.

Renewables Could Head Off EU Natural Gas Boom as Germany Phases Out Coal

Renewable energy may be poised to head off a boom in natural gas demand that European producers expected to see in the wake of Germany’s coal phaseout plan.

Insect Collapse Over Next Century Could Trigger ‘Catastrophic Ecosystem Collapse’

The world’s insect populations could disappear in the next century, triggering a “catastrophic collapse of nature’s ecosystems”, according to a first-ever global scientific review that points to climate change as one of the main threats to species that are a foundation of the Earth’s food chains and ecosystems.

Stewart: CAPP is Asking Albertans to ‘Vote for Climate Destruction’

Albertans this spring and Canadians this fall should not be fooled into voting for climate destruction just because Big Oil wants them to, Greenpeace Canada Senior Energy Strategist Keith Stewart writes in an opinion piece for iPolitics.

Retired B.C. Lawyer Risks 28-Day Sentence to Invoke Necessity Defence for Pipeline Protest

A retired lawyer from Vancouver is risking a 28-day prison sentence to test the necessity defence as a legal strategy to block fossil projects that would drive up the greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change.

Health Professionals Point to Cumulative Impacts of Wildfire Smoke

Experts who attended a wildfire workshop hosted by the British Columbia Lung Association last week in Vancouver are sounding the alarm about the health threats posed by wildfire smoke.

Atmospheric Methane Increases Could ‘Negate or Reverse Progress’ on CO2 Cuts

Increases in atmospheric methane between 2014 and 2017 could put the targets in the Paris Agreement out of reach, and point to the “urgent need to reduce methane emissions, especially from the fossil fuel industry,” according to a new research article published last week by the American Geophysical Union.

Fossils’ Poor Stock Performance Makes Case for Divestment: IEEFA

Pouring more dollars into the fossil sector no longer makes sense for investors paying attention to a decade of poor stock performance, the gradual departure of institutional investors, depressed profits, a shaky future outlook, and the fact that fossils placed dead last in the 2018 Standard & Poors 500 stock market index, the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis argues in a new briefing note.

Equipment Manufacturer Urges Bold Energy Efficiency Action to Meet Paris Climate Goals

Energy efficiency is poised to meet the carbon reduction targets in the Paris Agreement, depends on readily-available technology, and constitutes a trillion-dollar opportunity, writes Kim Fausing, President and CEO of Danish energy systems manufacturer Danfoss, in a recent post for the World Economic Forum. All that’s needed is a change of mindset on the part of energy consumers—especially the big industrial ones—and smart governance.

Lake Warming Above 1.5°C Means Less Winter Ice, More Summer Algae

The number of lakes throughout the Northern Hemisphere likely to remain ice-free in winter, and correspondingly clogged with algal blooms in summer, would more than double at 2.0°C average global warming and quadruple at 3.0°C, according to a recent study published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Origami-Style Window Blinds Would Produce Solar Electricity, Deliver Better Daylighting

An Australian architectural design firm is working on a new origami-style window blind that produces electricity and even brings more natural daylighting into the space.

Average Warming Could Temporarily Exceed 1.5°C in Next Five Years

Four major meteorological agencies have now confirmed that 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record, with the UK Met Office calculating a 10% chance that average global warming will temporarily exceed the critical 1.5°C threshold in at least one of the next five years.

‘Terrifying Assessment’ Shows Himalayas Losing One-Third of Ice by 2100 in Best-Case GHG Scenario

The Mount Everest area will lose more than half of its ice by 2100 in even the most optimistic greenhouse gas reduction scenario, and the Himalayan region as a whole will lose more than one-third, according to a 627-page regional assessment released this week by the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD).

UK Carbon Dioxide Emissions Fall 38% from 1990 to 2017

Cleaner electricity and reduced energy demand were the two major factors driving a 38% drop in the United Kingdom’s carbon dioxide emissions between 1990 and 2017, from 600 to 367 megatonnes, the biggest reduction in any industrialized country.

Green New Deal Draft Commits to Net-Zero GHG, Leaves Out Fossil Phaseout Deadline

With Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey set to outline Democrats’ Green New Deal legislation within days, a recent draft includes a commitment to “net-zero greenhouse gas emissions” but appears to leave out an explicit deadline for phasing out oil, natural gas, and coal development in the United States.

Supreme Court Holds Bankrupt Fossils Responsible for Cleaning Abandoned Sites

A Supreme Court of Canada ruling that holds bankrupt fossils responsible for cleaning up their abandoned oil and gas wells will produce lasting impacts across western Canada, but may not completely address the massive environmental liabilities the companies leave behind, according to initial reporting and analysis of the decision.

Fort McMurray Adopts 75-Kilometre Ban on Fly-In/Fly-Out Work Camps

Staring down fierce opposition from tar sands/oil sands companies, councilors from Fort McMurray and the surrounding region have voted to impose a moratorium on fly-in/fly-out work camps that critics increasingly identify as benefiting only the fossils’ bottom-line, while extracting steep costs from surrounding communities.

Trans Mountain’s ‘Amateur Hour’ Work Destroys River Habitat, Endangers Salmon

Federally-owned Trans Mountain Corporation’s “amateur hour” work on the Stewart Creek river crossing in Chilliwack, British Columbia has destroyed habitat and will reduce food sources for coho and chum salmon that are part of the diet of the endangered southern resident killer whale pod off the west coast.

Ottawa Won’t ‘Cut Corners’ on Trans Mountain Review, Sohi Says

With the National Energy Board set to report February 22 on the marine impacts of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi said last week the government won’t take any shortcuts in its review of the project—even though he understands how badly Alberta oil and gas workers want to get construction under way.

Fuel-Efficient Trucks Would Save 6.2 Gigatons of Carbon by 2050

Increasing fuel efficiency in the global freight trucking industry places #40 on Drawdown’s list of climate solutions. It could reduce atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide by 6.2 gigatons by 2050, at a net cost of US$543.5 billion, but $2.78 trillion in net savings.

Solar, Wind, Storage Set for Breakout Year Thanks to ‘Remorseless’ Cost Reductions

World-wide renewable generation capacity could grow by more than 200 gigawatts this year, thanks to “remorseless reductions in the costs of solar and wind electricity and of lithium-ion batteries,” according to a commentary published earlier this month by Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

2019 Set to Deliver Big Jump in Atmospheric CO2

Scientists are looking ahead to a “worrying” jump in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations this year, right on the heels of a report declaring 2018 the fourth-warmest year on record.

Germany to Phase Out Coal by 2038, Pay €40 Billion for Regional Transition

Germany will shut down all its coal plants by 2038 and pay out at least €40 billion (US$45.7 billion) to support a just transition in affected regions if the country accepts recommendations finalized Saturday by a government-appointed coal commission.

France Plans 300 MW of New Solar Capacity to Replace 40-Year-Old Nuclear Plant

France has received European Commission approval for a €250-million plan to replace the 40-year-old Fessenheim nuclear generating station by contracting for 300 megawatts of new photovoltaic solar capacity.

China Moves to Phase Out Subsidies as Solar, Wind Prices Become Competitive with Coal

With the end of 2020 as a target date to phase out renewable energy subsidies, China’s National Energy Administration (NEA) has unveiled a package of eight “enticements” for developers that are prepared to consider subsidy-free solar and wind projects over the next two years, Greentech Media reports.

Deloitte Sees 21 Million EVs in 10 Years, Cost Parity in 2021/2022

Another major consultancy is predicting electric cars’ dominance over conventional vehicles, with Deloitte projecting EVs’ total cost of ownership matching internal combustion as early as 2021 in the UK and 2022 globally, and no later than 2024.

Trump, Other Disasters Drive U.S. Climate Concern to Record Levels

Recent polling shows a sharp jump in Americans’ awareness of the climate crisis, with nearly three-quarters accepting the reality of climate change and worrying about how it affects their lives. And there’s some indication that Donald Trump is one of the disasters driving the uptick in awareness.

Six Pipelines, Assorted Tax Breaks Lead Fossil Wish List as Alberta Election Approaches

Government support for six new tar sands/oil sands pipelines and four major liquefied natural gas (LNG) projects, along with assorted tax cuts and regulatory breaks, led the wish list the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) released Tuesday in advance of the provincial election coming up in Alberta this spring.

‘Planetary Health Diet’ Would Cut Emissions, Protect Biodiversity by Halving Red Meat Consumption

The world’s first-ever science-based “planetary health diet” is calling for a “new global agricultural revolution” in which red meat and sugar consumption is cut by half, and vegetable, fruit, pulse, and nut consumption double, in order to avert 11 million deaths per year, curtail the devastating climate impacts of industrial agriculture, and protect biodiversity.

Albertans Paying the Price for Delinquent Oil Wells

Toronto Stock Exchange Joins Global Green Finance Network

IRENA Pegs Renewables as Most Affordable Power for Gulf States

Include Climate Impacts in Trans Mountain Review, IPCC Authors Urge NEB

New fossil projects like the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion will make it far tougher to meet the 1.5°C global warming target that is essential for averting the worst effects of climate change, a Canadian climate scientist told the National Energy Board this week.

CN, Alberta First Nation Plan Pilot Plant to Produce ‘Bitumen Pucks’

CN Rail and the Heart Lake First Nation northeast of Edmonton are planning to build a pilot plant this year to produce “bitumen pucks”, a solid tar sands/oil sands bitumen product that would float on water, could be delivered without pipelines or oil tankers, wouldn’t require diluent, and could increase fossil producers’ profits by C$15 per barrel.

Massive U.S. Oil and Gas Expansion Imperils Global Climate Goals, Oil Change Warns

The United States is “gearing up to unleash the largest burst of new carbon emissions in the world between now and 2050,” with an oil and gas expansion equivalent to nearly 1,000 coal-fired power plants, according to an explosive new analysis released last week by Oil Change International and 17 other organizations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_East_Africa_drought

Climate Deaths by 2030 Could Exceed UN Agency’s Estimate of 250,000 Per Year

The World Health Organization may have been too “conservative” with its prediction that climate change will kill 250,000 people per year between 2030 and 2050, according to a new analysis published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

12,500 Students in Belgium Skip Classes, Demand National Climate Action

About 12,500 students in Belgium skipped classes last Thursday, in what they hope will be a weekly protest inspired by 15-year-old Greta Thunberg’s school strike in Sweden.

Ottawa Unlikely to Unload Trans Mountain Before Federal Election, Despite Some First Nations’ Interest

The federal government will almost certainly retain ownership of the Trans Mountain Pipeline beyond this year’s federal election, Finance Minister Bill Morneau and Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi said in separate media interviews earlier this week, even with a group of First Nations expressing strong interest in bidding for the troubled project.

Buck: Albertans Are Frustrated, but Pipeline Protesters Aren’t Singling Them Out

A singular focus on pipeline politics and carbon pricing may be distracting from all the other steps Canada must also take to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions—but oil and gas isn’t the only focus for groups working against climate change, and no one is trying to single out or target just one Canadian province, writes Joshua Buck, Alberta climate program manager for Environmental Defence.

64% Chance that Full Fossil Phaseout Would Keep Average Warming Below 1.5°C

Humanity would have a 64% chance of keeping average global warming under the crucial 1.5°C threshold if all fossil infrastructure were replaced with zero-carbon alternatives at the end of its operating life, according to a new study in the journal Nature Communications.

Study Shows Antarctic Ice Loss Speeding Up Six-Fold Since 1979

An influx of warm ocean water has boosted the rate of Antarctic ice loss six-fold over the last 40 years, in what the Washington Post calls a “startling new finding” that “could mean sea levels are poised to rise more quickly than predicted in coming decades.”

Fossil-Funded Pipeline Convoy Folds, Leaving Supremacist-Affiliated Yellow Vests in Charge

One of the two dueling convoys sending pro-pipeline protesters to Ottawa has folded. The announcement Monday by fossil-funded Canada Action leaves the route along the eastbound Trans-Canada Highway open to Yellow Vests Canada, a group that seems at least as interested in arresting Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for “treason” and vilifying ex-U.S. president Barack Obama and billionaire philanthropist George Soros as it is in seeing new pipelines built for the Alberta oilpatch.

Oceans Warming Faster Than IPCC Estimate, China-U.S. Study Concludes

The world’s oceans are up to 50% warmer than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated in its most recent report, and the rate of warming is still accelerating, a team of Chinese and U.S. scientists concludes in a study published Thursday in the journal Science.

Internal Combustion Growth is ‘Over’ in China, Spelling Trouble for Global Oil Markets

The rise of electric cars in China spells trouble for anyone planning to sell fossil fuels into an increasingly volatile global market, U.S.-based author and journalist Gregor Macdonald told CBC last week.

Veteran Negotiator Declares UN Climate Process a ‘Co-opted Charade’, Paralysed by ‘Groupthink’

United Nations climate negotiations are paralysed by “groupthink” and won’t deliver the speed and depth of carbon reductions that will hold off the worst effects of climate change, writes veteran COP participant Kit Vaughan, in a recent post on the Lush Cosmetics website that calls for stepped-up citizen action in lieu of an incremental, fossil-dominated UN process.

Pelosi Promises New Climate Bill in U.S. House

United States House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) is vowing to table new legislation on climate change modelled on the cap-and-trade bill her caucus introduced and passed in 2009, only to have it die on the floor of the U.S. Senate.

TransCanada Plans June Construction Start for Keystone XL Pipeline

TransCanada Corporation is hoping to start construction on the Keystone XL pipeline in June, with the aim of bringing it online in early 2021.

U.S. CO2 Emissions Rise 3.4% in 2018

Carbon dioxide emissions in the United States grew 3.4% in 2018, their second-biggest jump in two decades, delivering what the Washington Post calls “a jarring increase” at a time when scientists are stressing the need to drastically reduce emissions.

India Plans Another 500 Gigawatts of Renewable Capacity by 2028

India has unveiled bold plans to procure an additional 500 gigawatts of renewable energy capacity by 2028, including 350 GW from solar and 140 from wind, with the objective of producing 40% of its electricity from non-fossil fuels by 2030.

Renewables Exceed 40% of German Power Supply, Outpace Coal for the First Time

Renewable energy supplied 40.4% of Germany’s electricity last year, exceeding the output from coal for the first time, according to a report released last week by applied science researchers at the Munich-based Fraunhofer Society.

French Climate Petition Approaches Two Million Signatures in One Week as Groups Plot Legal Action

A petition protesting France’s failure to honour its commitments under the 2015 Paris Agreement has collected nearly two million signatures in one week, making it the country’s most popular sign-on ever—far exceeding the tally for the country’s well-publicized gilets jaunes (Yellow Vests) movement, at just over a million.

UK Labour Party Promises ‘Economic Revolution’ to Tackle Climate, Create Green Jobs

An “economic revolution to tackle the climate crisis, using the full power of the state to decarbonize the economy and create hundreds of thousands of green jobs in struggling towns and cities” would be in the offing for the United Kingdom if the opposition Labour party formed a government, The Guardian reports, citing an interview with the party’s shadow business secretary Rebecca Long-Bailey.

India’s Oil and Gas Subsidies Down 70%, But Coal Bailouts Continue

India cut its oil and gas subsidies 70% between 2014 and 2017 and increased renewables subsidies six-fold over the same period, according to an analysis issued late last year by the International Institute of Sustainable Development (IISD) and the Delhi-based Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW).

Pelosi Unveils Climate Crisis Panel, But Details Leave Progressives Fuming

With the new United States Congress due to be sworn in today, the new Democratic majority in the House of Representatives is already at odds over the composition and mandate of the reconstituted House Select Committee on Climate Crisis, which had been seen as a possible pathway for the Green New Deal advocated by the progressive wing of the caucus.

Alberta Pans New $1.65-Billion Fossil Lifeline from Ottawa

Provincial politicians and fossil lobbyists are panning the federal government’s latest concession to Alberta oil and gas producers, after Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi and International Trade Diversification Minister Jim Carr announced C$1.6 billion in industry support at an event in Edmonton yesterday.

International Climate Action Must Include Limits on Fossil Fuel Supply

Constraints on fossil fuel supplies are needed alongside effort to reduce demand if the countries that participated in COP 24 earlier this month hope to gain control of the climate crisis, geographers Philippe Le Billon of the University of British Columbia and Berit Kristoffersen of Arctic University of Norway write for Policy Options.

Recognition of Loss and Damage Emerges as COP 24 Success Story

Recognition of the loss and damage vulnerable countries face due to the inevitable impacts of climate change is emerging as a major success story in the aftermath of this year’s United Nations climate change conference in Katowice, Poland.

Saudi Negotiator Lays Out Objections to IPCC’s 1.5°C Report

In the first week of this year’s United Nations climate change conference, Saudi Arabia was one of four petro-states that blocked delegates’ full acceptance of the IPCC report on 1.5°C pathways, chewing up scarce and valuable negotiating time along the way. In a subsequent interview with Carbon Brief Editor Leo Hickman, senior Saudi negotiator Ayman Shasly claimed that “we adore and we really like the Paris Agreement” and laid out his country’s reasoning for standing firm against full adoption of the report.

India Plans New Solar, Wind Tenders to Hit 175-Gigawatt Target by 2022

India is planning to issue tenders for 60 gigawatts of new solar and 20 GW of new wind capacity over the next two years, in a bid to hit its target of installing 175 GW of new renewable energy generation by 2022.

China Dumps ‘Clean’ Coal from Green Bond Criteria, Still Exports Outdated Coal Technology

China is dumping so-called “clean coal” from the guidelines for its green bond programs, a decision that will match up the country’s green finance definitions more closely with the standard set by the global Climate Bonds Initiative.

Global Wind Industry on Track to Grow 680 Gigawatts Over 10 Years

The global wind industry is on track to deliver more than 680 gigawatts (680 billion watts) of new capacity over the next decade, according to two recent reports by Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables.

CNRL Aims to Cut Costs with Driverless Truck Field Test

Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. (CNRL) will spend C$75 million by late 2020 to field test driverless haulers at its Jackpine tar sands/oil sands mine in northern Alberta, Chief Operating Officer, Oilsands Scott Stauth told investors earlier this month.

Gender Equality Puts Climate Objectives Alongside Development Goals

Tuesday, December 11 was Gender Day at COP 24, a chance to underscore what gender equality means for effective climate action, and to identify what more can be done to unleash the power of half the world’s population.

Falling Cost of Renewables, Batteries Allows Countries to Boost Their Paris Commitments

The falling cost of renewable electricity and lithium-ion batteries will make it “substantially cheaper” for countries to fulfill their carbon reduction commitments under the Paris Agreement, according to a discussion paper released last month by Umwelt Bundesamt, the German environment agency.

Canadian Governments Introduce Four New Fossil Subsidies on Eve of UN Climate Conference

Just a week before delegates gathered in Katowice, Poland for this year’s United Nations climate change conference, Canadian governments introduced four generous new subsidies for the country’s oil and gas industry, writes Patrick DeRochie, program manager, climate and energy at Toronto-based Environmental Defence.

CO2 Emissions in Richest Countries Set to Show First Increase in Five Years

Carbon dioxide emissions in the world’s richest countries are on track to increase slightly this year after five years of reductions, and the International Energy Agency (IEA) is pointing to oil and gas consumption as the main culprit.

World Bank Doubles Climate Fund to $200 Billion for 2021-25

The World Bank has committed US$200 billion to fund climate change mitigation and adaptation between 2021 and 2025, a doubling of its previous budget, and is funding the two aspects of the crisis equally for the first time.

EU Sets 2050 Carbon Neutral Target, 10 Years Too Late for CAN-Europe

The European Union has set a 2050 deadline for carbon neutrality, 10 years later than the target adopted in early October by Climate Action Network-Europe in line with a 1.5°C limit on average global warming.

Notley Announces Mandatory Production Cuts to Drive Up Alberta Oil Price

Alberta will mandate an 8.7% reduction in oil production volumes, or 325,000 barrels per day, in the hope of driving up the price of the crude oil and tar sands/oil sands bitumen it sells into world markets, Premier Rachel Notley announced late Sunday.

http://tcktcktck.org/2011/09/climate-solutions-for-africa/

Developing Nations ‘Lead the Charge’, Outpace Wealthier Countries in New Clean Energy Capacity

Developing countries are “charging ahead of wealthier nations in the global green energy push,” adding more clean electricity than fossil fuel capacity in 2017 for the first time ever, according to a Bloomberg News report citing the annual Climatescope survey by Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

Climate Health Impacts Kill 2.1 Million World-Wide, 7,142 in Canada in 2017

Chronic exposure to the air pollution associated with greenhouse gas emissions kills 2.1 million people world-wide and 7,142 in Canada per year, according to the second edition of an annual countdown on climate change and health produced by The Lancet, one of the world’s most prestigious medical journals.

NEB’s ‘Redo’ Could Land Trans Mountain Project Back in Court

The National Energy Board’s “redo” of its failed review of the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is taking on the same look and feel as the process that drove the Federal Court of Appeal to shut down construction on the controversial project, writes attorney Eugene Kung argues in a post for National Observer.

Fossil Advocate Advises Industry to Declare ‘National No-Hydrocarbon Day’ Next July 1

In what reads like an overheated Atlas Shrugged moment, a fossil advocate is advising the Canadian oilpatch to “take a page from the CUPW playbook” and declare a rotating strike to get fast attention from the federal government.

Wider Emissions Gap Shows ‘Countries Are Not Doing Enough’, UN Agency Reports

The gap between countries’ greenhouse gas reduction plans and their promises under the Paris Agreement is even wider than previously believed, according to a major report released by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) ahead of the annual UN climate conference opening next week in Katowice, Poland.

National Securities Regulator Would Improve Canada’s Climate Risk Disclosure

A Supreme Court decision earlier this month could open the door for a more unified approach to sustainable finance and low-carbon growth, by allowing Canada to set up a single, national regulator for publicly-traded securities.

http://midwestenergynews.com/2013/10/24/as-pipeline-concerns-mount-a-renewed-focus-on-the-great-lakes-enbridge-mackinac-line-5/

Line 5 Pipeline Runs into Deadline Pressure, Legal Jeopardy as Michigan Governor Leaves Office

Enbridge’s controversial plan to replace the aging Line 5 pipeline with a US$500-million tunnel beneath the Straits of Mackinac between Michigan and Ontario is running into severe deadline pressure that could set it up for years of legal and regulatory delays, as Governor Rick Snyder prepares to step aside for a new administration.

U.S. Utilities Add Transmission and Renewables, Cut Coal as Grid Transition Continues

American Electrical Power (AEP), one of the larger investor-owned utilities in the United States, has unveiled a five-year, US$33-billion capital investment plan that focuses mostly on upgrading its transmission and distribution infrastructure.

U.S. Climate Assessment Shows Impacts ‘Intensifying Across the Country’

The effects of climate change in the United States are “intensifying across the country” and will soon add up to hundreds of billions of dollars per year without rapid corrective action, according to a national climate assessment released by the Trump administration on Friday, while a large proportion of U.S. citizens were preoccupied with the busiest shopping day of their year.

Climate Change Brings Severe Drought, Soaring Temperatures to War-Torn Iraq

After years of being devastated by war, Iraq faces increased climate stress in a hotter, drier future, according to a stark report released recently by the Expert Working Group on Climate-related Security Risks.

Unsubsidized Wind, Solar, and Batteries Beat Fossils on Price, BNEF Concludes

Unsubsidized wind and solar are new the cheapest source of new grid-scale power in all the world’s major economies except Japan, according to the latest electricity cost competitiveness report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

‘Carbon-Free’ Virtual Forum Demands 1.5°C Action for World’s Most Vulnerable Nations

The Climate Vulnerable Forum completed the world’s first-ever zero-emissions climate summit this week, a day-long virtual meeting that challenged the inevitably more carbon-intensive COP 24 in Katowice, Poland to usher in tougher national climate targets and make climate financing more available to vulnerable countries.

Slovakia Speeds Up Coal Subsidy Phaseout to 2023 as EBRD Considers Ending New Coal Financing

Slovakia is setting an accelerating timeline to phase out its coal mining subsidies by 2023, Economy Minister Peter Ziga told an energy conference in Bratislavia earlier this week.

EU’s New Efficiency, Renewable Energy Targets Will Overshoot Its 2030 Climate Goals

The European Union has adopted new energy efficiency and renewable energy targets that could actually overshoot the continent’s greenhouse gas reduction goals, after accounting for slower economic growth due to Brexit.

Researchers Acknowledge Errors in Study Methods, But Oceans Are Still Warming

The authors of a startling new study on ocean warming have filed a correction with the journal that originally published it and acknowledged “inadvertent errors that made their conclusions seem more certain than they actually are,” the Washington Post reports.

http://www.greenpeace.org/canada/en/campaigns/Energy/tarsands/

Cenovus Urges Government-Imposed Production Cuts to Drive Up Tar Sands/Oil Sands Revenue

One of the biggest fossils in the Canadian oilpatch, Cenovus Energy, is urging the Alberta government to impose temporary production cuts across the sector in a bid to “alleviate the wide differentials” between the world price for a barrel of oil and the deeply discounted amount that tar sands/oil sands producers can fetch.

Energy Efficiency Could Boost the Benefit of HFC Phasedown from 0.5 to 1.0°C

The governments behind the landmark Kigali Amendment on climate-busting hydro-fluorocarbon refrigerants are taking aim at energy efficiency improvements that could double the benefit of the HFC phasedown from 0.5 to 1.0°C.

Montana Judge Halts Keystone XL Pipeline

In what InsideClimate News is calling a “striking victory for environmental advocates” who’ve spent more than a decade fighting the project, a federal judge in Montana has ordered an immediate construction halt on the Keystone XL pipeline, after concluding the Trump administration failed to justify its executive order to restart the intensely controversial project.

Top Alberta Fossils Stayed ‘Incredibly Profitable’ Despite Oil Price Crash

Three of Canada’s top five tar sands/oil sands producers were “incredibly profitable” during the oil price crash and the continuing controversy over new export pipelines, according to a new report issued last week by the Alberta-based Parkland Institute and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

Imperial Announces New Tar Sands/Oil Sands Project as CNRL Berates Competitors’ ‘Windfall Revenues’

Less than a week after two of Canada’s top five tar sands/oil sands producers announced they were cutting back production due to the low price their bitumen fetches on world markets, ExxonMobil subsidiary Imperial Oil announced a C$2.6-billion project destined to increase the supply glut.

‘Inflection Point’ Shows U.S. Solar, Wind Less Costly to Own and Operate Than Existing Coal Plants

Finance and investment consultants at Lazard are the latest to conclude that renewable energy has reached an “inflection point”, where building new solar and wind capacity is often less expensive to build and operate than existing fossil-fired power plants.

Energy Efficiency Delivers Half of U.S. Power Sector’s Carbon Reductions Since 2005

The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) is taking a short victory lap for efforts to boost efficiency in the country’s electricity system, after a U.S. government agency reported demand reductions accounting for half of the sector’s greenhouse gas cuts since 2005.

Tar Sands/Oil Sands Look ‘Beyond Combustion’ for New Bitumen Products

Carbon fibre, pelletized asphalt, vanadium flow batteries, and polymers are on the list of possible products that Canadian tar sands/oil sands operators are considering as sources of demand for bitumen in a low-carbon future.

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2526511

UK Renewables Capacity Exceeds Fossils for First Time Ever

Renewable electricity capacity in Britain has overtaken natural gas and coal for the first time ever, according to a report issued earlier this week.

Canadian Fossils’ ‘Remarkable’ Production Cuts Show How a Managed Decline Could Work

Last Wednesday’s announcement by Cenovus Energy that it is cutting back its tar sands/oil sands production is a “remarkable” moment that shows how fossils “could act rationally to wind down production in the face of the urgent need to keep carbon in the ground,” according to an analysis by Oil Change International.

New Green Bonds Could Trigger $1 Trillion in Tar Sands/Oil Sands Activity

A new set of guidelines for clean transition bonds could unlock up to C$1 trillion to help tar sands/oil sands companies pursue their continuing quest to reduce the carbon intensity of their operations.

Solar and Wind Shift ‘from Mainstream to Preferred’ in New Deloitte Analysis

Solar and wind have shifted “from mainstream to preferred” energy sources, according to a new analysis by Deloitte Insights that points to renewables as the technologies “best able to meet new demand for reliable, affordable, and environmentally responsible energy.”

Regulator’s Scenario Shows $260 Billion in Unfunded Oilpatch Liabilities, Four Times the ‘Public’ Estimate

A “flawed system” of industrial oversight has left Alberta with a staggering C$260 billion in estimated liabilities for abandoned oil and gas facilities, more than four times higher than the figure previously disclosed in public documents from the Alberta Energy Regulator (AER), National Observer reports, based on a joint news investigation with Global News, the Toronto Star, and StarMetro Calgary.

‘Startling’ Warming Study Shows Oceans Absorbing 60% More Heat Than Scientists Thought

Global warming is farther advanced than scientists believed, with the world’s oceans absorbing 60% more heat per year over the last quarter-century than previously research had shown, according to a startling new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Migrant Caravan to U.S. Driven Primarily by Climate-Induced Drought

With Donald Trump sending 5,000 troops to his country’s southern border—and surprising the Pentagon yesterday by threatening a force of up to 15,000—in his latest attempt to head off hordes of Democratic voters in next Tuesday’s midterm elections, the United Nations and at least one aid agency are pointing to climate change as the main driver of the migrant caravan wending its way through Mexico to the United States.

Storms, Flooding Kill Six Across Northern Italy, Flood 70% of Historic Venice

About 70% of Venice was flooded earlier this week by the highest tides in at least a decade, with a regional weather system driving waters above 1.6 metres (63 inches) that even swamped the elevated sidewalks the city installed to accommodate rising waters.

Spain Plans Coal Phaseout by Year’s End, Unveils €250-Million Job Transition Fund

Spain’s new government and its unions have agreed on a transition plan to shut down most of the country’s coal mines by the end of this year and invest €250 million in mining regions over the next decade.

Habitat Loss, Over-Exploitation Drive Loss of 60% of World’s Wildlife in 44 Years

Habitat loss and over-exploitation, followed by climate change, are among the key factors that have led to the loss of 60% of the world’s wildlife population between 1970 and 2014, according to the latest edition of World Wildlife Fund’s Living Planet Report published Monday.

Abreu and Marshall: Canada Needs Better Accountability to Make Good on Paris Pledges

Canada must seize a “once-in-a-generation opportunity” to show it can make good on its international climate commitments by forming an independent expert body to monitor its progress on climate change and clean growth, two of the country’s leading climate policy advocates argue this week in a post for The Hill Times.

New Pipeline Wouldn’t Eliminate Price Discount on Lower-Quality Tar Sands/Oil Sands Crude

No new pipeline will ever be enough to eliminate the price discount Canadian tar sands/oil sands producers have to offer to get their product to market, according to a BNN Bloomberg commodities analysis this week that reinforces one of the key economic arguments coming from the climate and energy community.

Big Fossil Investments Give Canadian Banks an ‘Interest in Continued Growth’

Canada’s five biggest banks were among the fossil industry’s top investors between 2000 and 2015, according to a report last week by the Corporate Mapping Project (CMP), with the Royal Bank of Canada placing second only to ExxonMobil as the sector’s biggest single backer.

Hughes: Selling Off Fossil Resources at ‘Bargain Basement Prices’ is Poor Energy Strategy for Canada

Canada’s current practice of harvesting bitumen and fracked oil and gas and selling them off at bargain basement prices is a poor excuse for an energy strategy, Alberta-based earth scientist J. David Hughes argues in a recent opinion piece for the Edmonton Journal.

Intense Hurricane Obliterates Hawaiian Island

A 4.5-hectare Hawaiian island was literally wiped off the map forever when Hurricane Walaka swept through the region earlier this month, just a couple of weeks before Super Typhoon Yutu brought 290-kilometre-per-hour winds to the Northern Mariana Islands in the worst storm to hit United States territory since 1935.

Flash Flood in Jordan Kills 18, Mostly Children and Teachers

A flash flood near Jordan’s Dead Sea yesterday killed 18 people, mostly children and teachers on a school trip, producing what rescuers and hospital workers described as one of the country’s worst disasters in years.

Doctors Ask Trudeau for Independent Health Assessment of Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion

More than 200 health professionals from Canada and around the world are calling on the Trudeau government to conduct an independent health assessment of the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, citing key health impacts of climate change that will be made worse by the C$9.3-billion megaproject.

Off-Fossil Transition to Reach ‘Point of No Return’ in 2035, But Not Soon Enough for IPCC Target

The global shift to non-fossil energy will reach the point of no return by 2035, fossil analysts at Wood Mackenzie conclude in a recent report, creating an “unstoppable” shift off fossil fuels. But a faster transition will still be needed to hit the decarbonization targets set out two weeks ago in the IPCC’s landmark report on 1.5°C pathways.

Climate Change Already Making Local, International Conflicts Worse: Red Cross

Humanitarian organizations are already coping with the on-the-ground reality that climate change is making domestic and international conflicts worse, according to Peter Maurer, president of the International Committee of the Red Cross.

‘Clarion Call’ Study Points to ‘Hyper-Alarming’ Decline in Insect Populations

A “hyper-alarming” population decline in insects and the animals that feed on them extends across the Americas and is more serious than scientists previously believed, and climate change is the cause, according to a new study last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Energy Efficiency is Waning, But Could Quickly Drive Down Emissions, IEA Analysis Shows

Countries are falling behind on energy efficiency policies that would be enough to peak greenhouse gas emissions quickly and then drive them down, even if the global economy doubles through 2040, according to a new analysis released last week by the International Energy Agency.

Coal Industry Collapse Could Move Far Enough, Fast Enough to Hit IPCC’s 2030 Target: Analyst

The IPCC’s urgent call for the world’s power utilities to reduce coal consumption 60% by 2030 might look unrealistic through a business-as-usual lens. But it isn’t far off a mounting trend that has only begun to reflect the falling cost and heightened viability of renewable energy, writes Bloomberg News analyst David Fickling.

Seize the Moment for Climate Action, MPs Urge During Emergency Commons Debate

Canadians are feeling the effects of climate change today, and the next 10 to 12 years will give the country one chance to turn the corner on a mounting global crisis, key MPs told the House of Commons Monday evening, during an emergency debate on the implications of last week’s IPCC report on pathways to 1.5°C average global warming.

12-Mile Limit for Tanker Assessment Could Put NEB on ‘Another Collision Course with the Courts’

The National Energy Board’s decision to limit its reassessment of oil tanker traffic from the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion to a range of 12 nautical miles from the coast, rather than 200, is raising questions about how seriously the Board is taking the process—and could set the review up for yet another court challenge, according to one of the groups involved in the original legal battle against the project.

‘We Are Better Than This’: Berman Explores Alberta’s Energy Future. Notley Comes Back with Unicorns.

Activist, analyst, and policy advisor Tzeporah Berman called for civil discussion and a managed transition off fossil fuels, and Premier Rachel Notley tried to refute her with unicorns (seriously, literally), after a speaking invitation from the Alberta Teachers’ Association became one of the year’s most contentious moments in the debate over the province’s energy future.

Glynn: 100-Tonne Lifetime Emissions Limit Per Person Helps Define Nations’ Carbon Budgets

Last week’s debate on Ireland’s annual financial budget would have been a great opportunity for legislators to take a serious look at their “other” budget—their carbon budget—University College Cork post-doctoral energy modeler James Glynn argues in a recent post.

Appeal Court Orders Fast Emission Cuts in Landmark Decision Against Netherlands Government

An appeal court in The Netherlands put “all world governments on notice” this week, upholding a previous, historic legal order that the national government accelerate its plans to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

Zero-Energy Homes Now Affordable Enough for Mainstream Markets

After years of being perceived as a luxury product, the price of zero-energy homes has come down to the point that they’re now ready for “mainstream markets”, the Rocky Mountain Institute reports in a recent analysis.

Financial Windfall Ahead for Fossils That Abandon Tar Sands/Oil Sands, ‘Re-imagine Their Business’

The world’s most colossal fossils can look forward to a financial windfall as greenhouse gas controls drive up the price of the remaining oil they produce, according to a note to clients issued Monday by Goldman Sachs Group Inc.

‘Weak Financial Case’ Makes Teck Tar Sands/Oil Sands Project Unlikely to Succeed: IEEFA

Teck Resources Ltd.’s C$20.6-billion tar sands/oil sands megaproject in Alberta is unlikely to be commercially viable, offering “a weak financial case with little chance of remaining a going concern for the 41 years promised in the application,” the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis concludes in a report produced for Stand.earth.

350 Canada Urges Emergency Parliamentary Debate on 1.5°C Pathways [Sign-On]

Within hours of the IPCC’s release of landmark report on pathways to 1.5°C average global warming, 350 Canada was out with a petition calling on party leaders in the House of Commons to hold an emergency debate on the topic.

Reaction: IPCC Report Combines Urgency and Hope, but ‘Every 0.1° is a Choice Between Life or Death’

About 40 representatives of climate, energy, international development, and other groups affiliated with Climate Action Network-International were monitoring the negotiations in Incheon, South Korea. Here are some of their reactions to the IPCC’s 1.5°C report.

Saudi Arabia Made Best Efforts to Stall IPCC Science Report

It wouldn’t have been a United Nations climate negotiation without one of the world’s most profligate fossil fuel producers (and human rights abusers) trying to bog down the proceedings and water down a final report. And several news reports had Saudi Arabia doing exactly that as the IPCC meeting in Incheon, South Korea went into overtime Saturday.

IPCC Special Report Could Drive Faster, Deeper Carbon Cuts Through Talanoa Dialogue

With pressure and momentum building for countries to speed up their action on climate change in the crucial decade between 2020 and 2030, veteran climate negotiator Alden Meyer of the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) sees today’s IPCC report on 1.5°C as one of the building blocks for a significant “2020 moment” during COP 24 in December.

Pipeline Roundup: Ottawa Accepts Appeal Court Decision, Notley Supports ‘Indefinite’ Indigenous Consultation, and Environment Commissioner Scorches Marine Mammal Protections

Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi announced Wednesday that the Canadian government won’t appeal the late August Federal Court of Appeal ruling that suspended federal approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, and appointed retired Supreme Court judge Frank Iacobucci to run a new pipeline consultation with Indigenous communities.

Poitras: Trudeau’s ‘Grand Bargain’ on Trans Mountain Heeds Global Signals on Peak Oil Demand

With Conservatives blaming Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for killing one pipeline, the climate community scorching him for salvaging another one, and his pan-Canadian climate plan bleeding provincial support, a chance at a grand bargain on climate action and fossil fuel production “now appears to have been a typically Liberal attempt to be all things to all people,” CBC journalist Jacques Poitras writes in Policy Options.

Intense, Repeat Wildfires Pollute Rivers, Threaten Water Supplies

Wildfires are increasingly polluting rivers and threatening water supplies, according to a new study by the Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

Future of Work in a Warming World Faces ‘Deafening’ Silence

There’s been a “deafening” silence about the future of work in a warming world, even though “consequences of global warming will shake up the nature of work and the availability of employment for people in every country,” Dr. Carla Lipsig-Mummé, professor of work and labour studies at York University, writes this week for The Hill Times.

Economic Costs of Climate Change Will Hit Hardest in India, U.S.

The future economic costs of climate change will hit hardest in India and the United States, according to a new study published last week in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Species Diversity Determines Forests’ Resilience Against Drought

Species diversity is one of the key factors that determine a forest’s resilience against drought, according to new research on 40 temperate and boreal forests published last month in the journal Nature.

Rising Carbon Levels Reduce Ocean Oxygen Levels, Subjecting North Atlantic Species to ‘Slow Suffocation’

Atlantic wolffish and cod and Greenland halibut are at risk of slow suffocation as climate change drives oxygen depletion in the cold waters off eastern Canada, one of the world’s richest fishing grounds, a team of oceanographers reports in the journal Nature Climate Change.

U.S. Utilities, Global Fossils Fight Public Opinion to Slow 100% Renewables Transition

As public demand veers increasingly in the direction of 100% renewable energy, the utility and fossil industries are doing their best to dampen the enthusiasm, injecting what they see as a dose of reality into the drive to get runaway climate change under control.

Wind to Become Europe’s Biggest Source of Electricity by 2027

Wind power will be the single biggest source of electricity generation in Europe, at 23% of total demand, by 2027, International Energy Agency Executive Director Fatih Birol told participants at WindEurope’s Global Wind Summit last week.

Draft Plan Boosts China’s 2030 Renewables Goal from 20 to 35%

A new renewable portfolio standard (RPS) under development by China’s National Development and Reform Commission calls for the country to produce at least 35% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2030, a big jump from its previous 20% target for “non-fossil fuels”, according to draft documents viewed by Bloomberg News.

Banks Swing into Action as Investors Demand Closer Look at Carbon Risk

With more and more investors taking an interest in the carbon footprint of the companies whose stocks they hold, the country’s chartered banks “are responding by offering tools and services to meet growing demand for transparency on carbon emissions,” the Financial Post reports.

With Countries ‘Nowhere Near on Track’ to 1.5°C, IPCC Author Urges Massive Transformation

A massive transformation in the world’s energy production, transportation patterns, and food systems will be needed to limit average global warming to 1.5°C—and right now, countries are “nowhere near on track” to achieve that goal, according to an author of the forthcoming report on 1.5° scenarios produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

One Planet Summit Delivers New Financing Commitments During Climate Week NYC

The United Nations secretary general, the president of the World Bank, and UN Special Envoy for Climate Action Michael Bloomberg all lined up alongside French President Emmanuel Macron this week to host the second annual One World Summit, with the goal of mobilizing financing to support climate action.